WSAR NEWS

Somerset And The Issues At Brayton Point

The relationship between the town of Somerset and the current owners of the Brayton Point Power Plant site has been strained this Fall.

 

According to selectmen member Holly McNamara, St. Louis-based C.D.C has been less than forthcoming about their plans for demolition as well as other pieces of information.

 

McNamara told WSAR News there were issues leading up to the demolition of the cooling towers earlier this year. 

 

She also told us about an unplanned demolition that took place over the Summer and how the town is attempting to try to maintain open and truthful discussions.

 

"C.D.C took ownership of not informing us,” she said. “We gave them a hard time. From the get-go, we've been pushing for open and honest communication so we can especially communicate to the residents what's going on. That has not been the case, whatsoever."

 

McNamara explained the situation that happened in the late Summer at the site in which the town was not aware of.

 

"The town administrator put out a letter on behalf of the building and fire departments, as well as my board,” she said. “Back in August, there was a loud boom and a smoke cloud. No one was aware of why there would be either of those things. No one called it in.” 

 

The Somerset selectmen member continued, “The fire department took it upon themselves to go down there with the building department and the inspector. They discovered, at the time, they had demolished an additional portion of the building out-of-permit."

 

The unplanned demolition led to a fire. 

 

"There was a fire because of the demo,” McNamara said. “That was a huge problem. They put them through the process of getting a permit for demolition. It was a completely different company that did the cooling towers. Whoever this company was thought they could do whatever they wanted."

 

A series of fires at the Brayton Point site has halted further demolition efforts as the C.D.C has been asked to solve water pressure problems and install more hydrants.

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