Infinite Menus, Copyright 2006, OpenCube Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Fox Sports Radio Every Weekend on WSAR
Tony From The Right Saturdays at 11 AM
Super Bowl XLIX Sunday on WSAR, with a 2pm Pregame and a 6:30pm kickoff.
Tuesday: Law Talk 1, Crusin with Bill 2, Sense & Nonsense 3
Alan Combs and America Overnight Weeknights at 10
Dr Ross Thursday at 1 PM
The WSAR Newsroom Weekdays at Noon
Freedom Speaks Gun Talk Saturday at 10 AM
Friday: Ask Your Pharmacist 1, Arts & Entertainment 2
Weekdays: Hec 5, Ric 9, Women's Intuition 10, Ray Mitchell 11
Lars Larson Weeknights 6
Wednesday: Voice of Business 1, CU Wednesday 2
Friday Morning: Ask Carl 10, Your Healthy Home 11
Monday on WSAR: The Financial Planning Hour at 1pm
Everything Auto Noon Sunday brought to you by Mike's Auto Body
Voice of Business with Rob Mellion at 1pm Wednesday on WSAR
Celtics and Wolves Wednesday; Celtics Draft Kings Tonight at 7:30, tip at 8.
Celtics and Denver Friday on WSAR; Draft Kings Celtics Tonight at 8:30
Health
Subscribe To This Feed

California Dept. of Public Health Calls E-Cigarettes a 'Community Health Threat'


scyther5/iStock/Thinkstock(SACRAMENTO, Calif.) -- A report issued by the California Department of Public Health on Wednesday calls electronic cigarettes a "community health threat."

CDPH Director and State Health Office Ron Chapman wrote the introduction to the report, highlighting his concerns regarding marketing methods that "may...mislead consumers into believing that these products are harmless and safe for consumption." Chapman noted that there were 154 e-cigarette poisonings among children age five and under in 2014 -- well up from the seven such poisonings in 2012.

Chapman also mentioned the $2 billion, 25-year investment in efforts to prevent and reduce tobacco use in California.

According to the report, e-cigarettes contain products that produce aerosol -- not just water vapor -- to be inhaled by the user. That aerosol can contain chemicals like formaldehyde, lead, nickel and acetaldehyde, which are found on California's list of chemicals known to cause cancer, birth defects and reproductive harm.

The CDPH made several recommendations to restrict the sale and use of e-cigarettes, among them were the prohibition of e-cigarette sales to minors around the U.S., prohibition of free samples or e-cigarette vending machines in facilities where minors may spend time, and required registration of e-cigarette products with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The CDPH also aims to require a nicotine health warning on all e-cigarette products, while also mandating manufacturers disclose the ingredients of their product.

The CDPH further says it will create an educations campaign to impart the health dangers of e-cigarettes.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Girl Dies After Catching the Flu, Even After Getting Vaccine


Courtesy Patrick Driscoll(LAS VEGAS) -- A Las Vegas kindergartner who died days after coming down with the flu felt well enough to play outside 24 hours before she collapsed, her father told ABC News.

Kiera Driscoll, 5, had a slight fever on Sunday morning, but she seemed to be feeling better after taking some children's ibuprofen, said her father, Patrick Driscoll.

"In fact, she was playing outside that afternoon with my wife and even made a comment that it was 'the most fun time ever,'" Patrick Driscoll said.

But then Kiera's slight fever returned and her cough worsened and included phlegm, Driscoll said. At about 4 a.m., her parents gave her medicine to help expand her airways by way of an albuterol nebulizer. She didn't have asthma but occasionally had a barking cough as a baby, Driscoll said. Afterward, he stayed up with her watching cartoons until she fell asleep again at 8 a.m.

The next morning, the Driscolls took her to an urgent care center, where she got another albuterol treatment and was given a steroid to help her breathe, Driscoll said. He went to work, and his wife stayed home to take care of Kiera.

Kiera's mother tucked her into bed a few hours later for a nap, and turned away to turn on a vaporizer when Kiera said, "I can't breathe. It's hard to breathe," Driscoll said. Then, the little girl collapsed and passed out.

Kiera's mother is trained in CPR and jumped into action, clearing Kiera's airways, performing rescue breathing and calling 911, Driscoll said. Kiera's pulse went away and came back in the emergency room. But her brain wave activity diminished, Driscoll said, and she developed an irregular heart beat and went into cardiac arrest. She died the following day, on Tuesday, Jan. 20.

"Their working diagnosis was that a mucus plug of thick mucus got coughed up and clogged, lodged in her trachea, preventing her from being able to breathe," Driscoll said.

The little girl's elementary school celebrated her life last week by dressing in purple, releasing purple balloons and eating frozen yogurt, according to KNTV, ABC News' affiliate in Las Vegas. Frozen was Kiera's favorite movie, and a stuffed Olaf doll sat in her seat at school after her death, according to the station.

Laurel Beckstead, the headmaster of the American Heritage Academy, where Kiera went to school, told KNTV the death was shocking. Beckstead is also Kiera's aunt.

"She went home happy, healthy, and then to get a phone call that Monday that she had gone to Quick Care Monday morning, released and went home and then later collapsed, was almost a shocking disbelief," Beckstead told the station. "How can this be happening to Kiera?"

As of the week ending Jan. 17, 56 pediatric flu-related deaths had been reported to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Kiera's official cause of death was that she went into cardiac arrest after coming down with influenza A and pneumonia, according to the Clark County coroner's office in Nevada, which did not examine her body after her death.

Dr. Frank Esper, a pediatric infectious disease physician at UH Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital in Cleveland, said deaths like Kiera's can be confusing, and some states require autopsies when the explanation is unclear. He said it's important to remember that influenza can cause death, especially in people with underlying lung and heart conditions -- which may not be diagnosed.

People at risk for complications, including young children, pregnant women, people with asthma, and the elderly, should contact their physician at the first sign of flu, he said. They may be prescribed antiviral medications to shorten their illness and prevent it from worsening.

"Though Kiera's passing has shattered the world her birth created for me, the joy of raising her was worth it," Driscoll said at her funeral, according to the family's fundraising site.

Driscoll told ABC News that Kiera got a flu shot, and they still want other parents to vaccinate their children.

"Vaccines help save lives, and they help keep other people from getting infected as well," he said. "We always want people to be vaccinated."

He said his family has taken comfort in the fact that his wife knew CPR and did everything she could. And he knows he'll see his little girl again someday, he said.

"If there's something we can say to someone going through something similar," he said. "Hold on to your faith. Rely on family and community, and never take a moment for granted."

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

How Doctors, Parents May Be Contributing to Rise of Measles


iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Medical experts considered measles essentially eradicated in this country thanks to large scale vaccination. But with at least 64 confirmed cases of measles this month, the disease seems on pace to have its worst year in nearly two decades.

Many young doctors are slow to recognize measles and may not realize its potential dangers, said Dr. Richard Besser, ABC News' chief health and medical editor. This may have contributed to the current outbreaks at Disneyland in California and in 11 other states and Mexico, he said.

“Pediatricians who have never seen the measles tend to undervalue the vaccination and it’s concerning they may miss a child with measles,” Besser said, adding that he, himself, hasn’t seen a case in more than 20 years.

Earlier this week, an infectious disease specialist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia echoed that thought in an essay in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. In the opinion piece, Dr. Julia Shaklee Sammons implored doctors to become more familiar with measles symptoms now that infections from the virus are on the rise.

“It is essential that providers maintain a high level of suspicion for measles...and are able to recognize its clinical features,” she wrote.

People infected with measles are highly contagious for at least four days before symptoms including fever, pink eye and a telltale rash appear. Unfortunately, these are also symptoms of many other common diseases, Besser said, which is why it’s so hard to diagnose -- and why it’s essential to recognize it early.

Parents who delay or refuse vaccinations for their children may also contribute to the rise of measles infections, Besser said.

Many counties in California, for example, are below the 92 percent vaccination rate required for “herd immunity” the threshold of vaccinated individuals needed to protect even those who don’t receive the vaccination, according to state health officials. The opt-out rate for vaccinations has doubled in the past seven years.

"There's discredited science linking vaccines to autism. As a parent and pediatrician, there's no concern with the vaccine. What happens is that when a vaccine works really well, like the measles vaccine, people think they don't need it and then it comes back and we see these kinds of cycles," he said.

Besser noted that one year before the introduction of the measles vaccine in 1962, there were 481,530 reported cases nationwide. In 2004, there were 37 cases, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That number has been creeping up steadily each year.

The CDC recommends all children get two doses of the MMR (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) vaccine, starting with the first dose at 12 through 15 months of age, and the second dose at 4 through 6 years of age. The agency and most other medical organizations state that the vaccination has led to a 99 percent reduction in cases of the measles in the U.S.

Measles can be a deadly disease, Besser stressed.

“Before we began vaccinating, 500 people died a year from measles and it’s still one of the biggest global killers of children,” Besser said.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Some Commonly Used Drugs Could Spur Alzheimer's and Dementia


iStock/Thinkstock(SEATTLE) — Seniors are being warned to cut back on the use of certain over-the-counter medications as well as older antidepressants as they may hasten the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

A study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine says that the sleep-aid Nytol and anti-allergy drugs Benadryl and Piriton contain ingredients that block the key chemical messenger acetylcholine, which is essential to healthy cognitive functions.

Study leader Shelly Gray of the University of Washington School of Pharmacy says the antidepressant doxepin also falls into this category of anticholinergic drugs, which can cause sleepiness and poor memory.

After studying 3,434 men and women age 65 and older, those taking high dosages of these drugs compared to those who didn't had a 63 percent risk of developing Alzheimer's and a 54 percent higher risk of developing dementia.

Still, Gray cautions seniors who might be on these meds to consult their physicians before they stop taking these drugs.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Meghan Trainor Was ‘Addicted to Diets’ Before Embracing Her Curves


Epic Records(NEW YORK) — Before she was singing about "bringing booty back" and embracing her curves, Meghan Trainor had to fight low self-esteem just like the rest of us. The 21-year-old singer admitted to U.K.’s Reveal that she used to be "addicted to diets," and tried to follow Beyonce's weight-loss secret.

Meghan tells the publication that her insecurities began in school when her best guy friend told her she’d be "so hot" if she lost ten pounds. She said she rushed home and told her mom she was “never eating again.” That's when she started researching fad diets online.

"I Googled, ‘What does Beyonce do?’ and decided I'd try the detox diet with cayenne pepper,” Meghan recalled. "Do you know how much I had to drink to get used to it? It was so gross. I stopped straight away. I was like, ‘This is not normal.’”

Meghan said she’s since met Beyonce, who's a fan of her music, and credits her for having a “real figure” in a business where many women feel they have to be skin and bones.

"I definitely feel like I'm 30 and I've been through a lot,” the 21-year-old singer said. “I haven't experienced anything crucial or devastating. But I got addicted to weird little diets and I quickly realized how stupid it was.”

Meghan said that when she first wrote her #1 Grammy-nominated hit “All About That Bass,” it was more about how she wished she felt, rather than how she actually felt, about her body. But once she started performing and getting positive feedback, she says, she started to feel more confident.  Now, she encourages her friends to love their bodies.

"I'm just 100 percent happier than I was,” she said. “The trick I tell my girlfriends now is that you have to say it out loud. You haven't got to nearly kill yourself on these diets. You just have to look in the mirror and tell yourself, ‘Damn I look good today!’”

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Stories from Moms Who Delivered Blizzard Babies


Paticia Strickland holds twins born in Massachusetts during Monday night's blizzard. (Courtesy UMass Memorial Medical Center)(NEW YORK) -- At 35 weeks pregnant, Paticia Strickland was joking with a friend about what would happen if she went into labor during the storm barreling toward the East Coast this week.

An hour later, she was on all fours as contractions came one after another for 20 minutes until an ambulance could arrive at her home in Worcester, Massachusetts.

"Contractions came out of nowhere," she told ABC News. "There was no warning at all. They were so strong, I just got the sudden urge to push."

Strickland's 5-year-old daughter cried as Strickland left in an ambulance alone after getting a few hugs and well-wishes from her family. All the roads were closed to non-essential traffic because of the snow emergency, so Strickland's husband couldn't follow her to the hospital. Worcester was expecting 18 to 20 inches of snow by the time the storm is over.

"I was so scared," said Strickland, 28, a homemaker with three other children.

As Strickland was sitting up in the back of an ambulance on the way to UMass Memorial Medical Center, her water broke, she said. Seconds later, her son Gabriel was born. But that wasn't the end of it.

When they pulled up to the hospital, Strickland was rushed to the operating room, where she then delivered baby Aliyah.

"I was only in labor for maybe 40 minutes," she said. "My first call was to my children's father to let him know that his children made it into the world."

When she told him Gabriel was born in the back of an ambulance, she said it sounded like he stopped breathing.

Strickland said she can't wait to take her "little minions" home. They were born premature, but they're expected to stay in the hospital only about 10 days, she said.

Meanwhile, in Nantucket, Massachusetts, Danielle Smith went into labor at the height of the storm -- just as the power went out.

She wasn't up to talking to ABC News on Tuesday, but she gave birth to baby Cayden Moore at 3:35 a.m. at Nantucket Cottage Hospital, a hospital official said.

"Cayden was born at the height of the blizzard just after the island had lost power, forcing the hospital to rely on its generator for power," said hospital spokesman Jason Graziadei.

ABC News' Boston station WCVB-TV reported on several other New England blizzard babies who just couldn't wait to make their arrival.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

SpongeBob SquarePants Turns Up in Child's X-Ray


Fuse/Thinkstock(JEDDAH, Saudi Arabia) -- A doctor in Saudi Arabia was astounded to find cartoon icon SpongeBob SquarePants in a child's x-ray.

Dr. Ghofran Ageely, a radiology resident at the King Abdulaziz University Hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, told ABC News he was surprised the cartoon character looked so clear in the x-ray. The item the child swallowed, which appears to be some kind of tiny pendant, looked like a "pin" when he first saw it.

"I thought it is just a pin," Ageely said in an email. "But when I opened the frontal view I was shocked to see SpongeBob looking at me with a big smile. Its angle and rotation are just perfect."

Ageely said the tiny SpongeBob was safely removed from the 16-month-old child through a scope.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

E. Coli Found in Winnipeg, Boil Water Advisory Issued


Tomjac80/iStock/Thinkstock(WINNIPEG, Manitoba) -- Health officials instituted a boil water advisory for the city of Winnipeg on Tuesday after two clusters of E. coli were located.

Officials at the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority say that no source for the contamination was located as of Tuesday afternoon. Still, residents east of the Red River were being urged to boil all water used for drinking, ice making, food and beverage preparation and teeth brushing. Officials say the advisory was issued as a precautionary measure.

The WRHA expects additional information to be available on Wednesday.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Study: 'Targeted' Biopsy May Help Detect High-Risk Prostate Cancer Early


Stockbyte/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have found a new method that may help detect high-risk prostate cancer early.

According to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers looked at 1,000 men with either elevated test results or suspicious results from rectal examinations with an MRI to identify suspicious areas of prostate cancer. The patients were then biopsied twice, including once with a standard biopsy method and once with a new "targeted" method.

The results of the study determined that the "targeted" method may be better for differentiating between low-, intermediate- and high-risk cancers.

The procedure for the "targeted" biopsy is the same as the standard biopsy, researchers say, making procedural risks more tolerable. Nonetheless, the study did not follow the participants for an extended period of time, making it impossible to determine the predictability of "targeted" biopsies for long-term outcomes, such as recurrence and mortality.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Sugary Drinks Could Be Linked to Earlier Onset of Menstruation


iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Researchers at Harvard Medical School say that sugary drinks may be linked to the earlier onset of menstruation.

According to a study published in the journal Human Reproduction, researchers surveyed girls between the ages of 9 and 14 who had not yet begun to have their periods, to calculate the amount of sugary drinks they consumed. They found that girls who drank more than 1.5 sugary drinks each day had their first periods about 2.7 months earlier, on average, than those girls who drank two or fewer sugary drinks each week.

Researchers say the results of the study held up even when accounting for other factors, such as ethnicity and BMI, which are believed to affect the onset of menstruation.

Earlier onset of menstruation has been linked to health risks including an increased lifetime risk of breast cancer.

The study shows only a link, not a cause, between consumption of sugary drinks and early menstruation. Researchers note that girls who drank more sugary drinks may also have other dietary habits contributing to the results of the study.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Latest Report Indicates 64 Measles Cases Linked to Disneyland


David McNew/Getty Images(SACRAMENTO, Calif.) -- The latest update from the California Department of Public Health notes 64 cases of measles linked to an outbreak at California's Disneyland.

The latest tally includes 50 cases in California with epidemiologic links to Disneyland, as well as 13 in other U.S. states and one in Mexico. The states affected by the outbreak thus far include Arizona, Colorado, Nebraska, Oregon, Utah and Washington.

Thirty-seven of the 50 measles cases in California are among patients over the age of 5, despite the fact that the first dose of the MMR vaccine is recommended for children between 12 and 15 months old. Health officials are urging parents to vaccinate their children.

Despite the fact that measles has been eradicated in the United States since 2000, outbreaks still occur overseas, and international travelers can bring the disease with them, in particular to locations where travelers and tourists may go -- including theme parks and airports.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Blizzard 2015: Dating Sites See Boom During Snow Storm


iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- As millions of people in the Northeast hunkered down during a massive winter storm this week, many took the excuse to stay indoors as a chance for a snow day hook-up.

Some dating sites reported record amounts of traffic over the past 24 hours in New York City and surrounding states, around the same time a storm was walloping the area, dumping as much as two feet of snow from New Jersey to Maine.

Match.com told ABC News exclusively it saw a big jump in the number of people logging on their site.

"For the blizzard states we’re seeing an increase of over 60 percent of email initiations between Match members," a Match.com spokesperson said.

OKCupid also reported a 10 percent spike in traffic.

Representatives from Tinder didn't respond to ABC News' request for user activity stats during the storm but the dating app, along with Facebook and Instagram, reported outages on Monday. Hinge, another popular dating app, declined to provide such numbers.

Some people in New York City even took to Craigslist to post “want ads” for “blizzard boyfriends” and girlfriends, hoping to find someone to snuggle with on the snow day. “Seeking a single 20- to 30-something female who shares my excitement for snow days,” one ad read.

“Seeking snow day make-out buddy” another ad read.

Adam, a Craigslist user who posted one of the snow day ads, said he did it as a joke, and received dozens of responses.

"I figured I'd post it, send it to a few friends for a laugh and maybe get one or two responses, which would also likely generate laughs," he told ABC News via email. "I truly thought of it as a joke, but one of those could-be-like-1-percent-truthful kind of jokes, because, after all, who doesn't want a snow-day make-out buddy?."

Another used named Phil C., who also posted a hook-up ad on Craigslist, said he didn't receive any responses.

“[I] Think most [people] on Craigslist are so very fake,” he said via email. “All they want to do [is] just ask for a photo, never answer you back.”

Relationship expert Logan Levkoff wasn't surprised by the uptick in activity on dating sites during the storm.

“Winters may be tough on singles because people can feel lonely during cold bleak times," Levkoff said. "A blizzard, especially one that traps you indoors, may motivate singles to seek connection."

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Longtime Anchor Announces ALS Diagnosis


ABC News(DURHAM, N.C.) -- Little did longtime news anchor Larry Stogner know that when he did the ALS ice bucket challenge last summer, he already had the genetic disease in his body.

Stogner, an anchor on ABC News' North Carolina station WTVD for 40 years, announced that he will be retiring and has been diagnosed with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.

"For nearly four decades, I've met you right here, usually at 6," Stogner began, addressing viewers. "Boy, we've seen a lot of change over those years. But, we have to stop meeting this way."

Before announcing the diagnosis, he drew attention to his voice.

"I am sure that in recent months, you've noticed a change in my voice, my speech [is] slower," he said. "Many of you were kind enough to email me ideas about what it might be, or just to show concern, and I truly appreciate that."

"As it turns out, I have ALS, Lou Gehrig's Disease," he added.

ALS, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a an incurable neurological disease that eventually causes the brain to stop communicating with the muscles. Those who have it eventually lose their ability to move and speak, and the condition is fatal. Some, like Stephen Hawking, are able to survive, in part, thanks to breathing mechanisms.

The ALS ice bucket challenge took the nation by storm as people challenged each other to either douse themselves with a bucket of ice water and share it on social media or donate to ALS research.

Stogner took the challenge, too, and said "little did I know it was about to change my life."

He said his career was over, and he was "blessed" to have had such a great job at WTVD. He will take a vacation and return to the air in two weeks to say goodbye to his viewers, he added.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Super Bowl Parties Hike Calorie Counts


iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Forget the New England Patriot’s deflategate. Diet experts say the real Super Bowl story is actually “inflategate” -- the anticipated eating frenzy at Super Bowl parties everywhere.

In fact, the average American will inflate their waistline several inches by gobbling up at least 2,400 calories during the four to five hour football viewing extravaganza, according to the Calorie Control Council, a low calorie food industry group.

That makes it the second biggest day of gluttony after Thanksgiving.

The number is far from scientific. Sylvia Poulos, the registered dietician who is a spokeswoman for the council, said the calorie consumption estimate comes from a list of popular food items people typically purchase for game day parties plus some statistics from other food industry groups.

Whatever the true count, the evidence does suggest a belt popping day of eating for the Feb. 1 game.

Americans will scarf down roughly 11.2 million pounds of potato chips, 8.2 million pounds of tortilla chips, 3.8 million pounds of popcorn, and 3 million pounds of nuts, said the Snack Food Association. They’ll eat nearly 1 billion chicken wings on game day, according to the National Chicken Council. An estimated 48 million Americans will also order takeout, predicted the National Restaurant Association, while another 12 million people during the big game.

The Calorie Control Council’s number assumes eating two slices of pizza, five mini hotdogs, a variety of chips, dip, wings and other snacks, at least three beers and regular sodas plus several desserts.

“You do tend to overeat because you’re so busy paying attention to the game, you don’t realize what’s going in your mouth,” said Connecticut-based exercise physiologist Tom Holland.

Studies by the Cornell University’s Food and Psychology lab confirmed Holland’s theory. Researchers threw a Super Bowl party so they could count up how many chicken wings their guests ate from a buffet. The subjects who had their leftover wing bones swept away ate, on average, seven wings -- an additional 200 calories compared to those who sat at the messier, un-bussed tables. When the wings were boneless, their calorie intake increased by 35 percent.

The lack of bones created a sort of caloric blindness in the party goers, head researcher Brian Wansink speculated.

"All the evidence of what they'd eaten was removed," he explained. "There was nothing left to remind them of how many calories they'd consumed."

Even someone trying to practice restraint can easily lob a calorie bomb at their diet, said Holland.

For example, eating just the two slices of pepperoni pizza and a few beers cross the 1000 calorie threshold and pack nearly a day’s worth of fat, cholesterol and sodium, according to calculations from the USDA nutrition database.

To counteract a Super Bowl spread, Holland recommended having a good offense and a good defense.

“Work out extra hard and really watch what you eat a few days before the game,” he advised. “Then after the game hit the gym harder for a couple of weeks and cut back on your calories.”

Holland also advised focusing your exercise efforts on shorter, higher intensity workouts because they burn a good number of calories in a short period of time and offer a temporary boost to the metabolism.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Subscribe To This Feed

Can 36 Questions Create Closeness Between Strangers?


iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Can you create closeness in 36 questions?

That’s what sociologist Arthur Aron attempts to do. In a study titled “The Experimental Generation of Interpersonal Closeness: A Procedure and Some Preliminary Findings,” published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, a journal of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Aron and his co-authors seek to discover whether they can “create closeness in a reasonably short amount of time.” The questions are designed to simplify things and help people get to know each other quickly.

Aron, of the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and his co-authors designed these questions based on a lot of research into how friendships naturally develop.

“The questions gradually get more and more personal, so they begin with questions that are almost small talk and then they move to talk about some of the deepest, most intimate things in your life,” he said.

The questions include the following:

  • Before making a telephone call, do you ever rehearse what you are going to say? Why?
  • If you could change anything about the way you were raised, what would it be?
  • When did you last cry in front of another person? By yourself?

Aron said the the questions gradually get more and more personal.

“They begin with questions that are almost small talk and then they move to talk about some of the deepest, most intimate things in your life,” he said, adding: “There's reason to think that getting close would facilitate love and feeling romantic feelings."

He said he and his co-authors designed the questions for strangers, but added that research suggests sharing personal things -- as long as it’s reciprocated and both parties are responsive -- helps all kinds of relationships.

Samantha Daniels, a professional matchmaker, sees the benefits and drawbacks of the list.

“Well, falling in love really is about chemistry and chemistry is an intangible, but what I say is you need two types of chemistry. You need physical chemistry and then you need mental and emotional chemistry so questions like these help people find that second half, which is the mental and emotional chemistry, but at the same time you have to be careful because you don't want to cross the line too quickly. You don't want to ask too many personal questions or pry because that could send you in the wrong direction,” she said.

On a first date, it’s important to not make your date uncomfortable, she said.

“You know, in the 36 questions there's one asking how you think you're going to die. You know that's a little extreme to be asking on a first date,” she said. “I think that that's off-putting, number one, and it puts you in a really serious, heavy place on a date and you just don't want to be in that place on a first date because it doesn't really help.”

Stuart Kenworthy, 28, and Kyle Godfrey-Ryan, 31, are complete strangers who took the 36 questions. They asked each other the questions, and completed the last part of the exercise by staring deeply into each other’s eyes for four minutes.

Asked how the exercise went, Godfrey-Ryan said there was “a lot more connection” than she expected.

“It was really disarming and I felt very vulnerable but happy and comfortable at the same time," she said.

Added Kenworthy: “I was nervous at first but definitely more comfortable as the questions progressed but I was worried about my answers. ‘Am I smiling too much, do I look nervous’ and as we progressed I became very comfortable with Kyle."

Godfrey-Ryan she would “definitely have coffee" with Kenworthy, and she believes the questions did what they were designed to do.

“They do work -- I believe they work,” she said.

Here are all 36 questions:

Set I

1. Given the choice of anyone in the world, whom would you want as a dinner guest?

2. Would you like to be famous? In what way?

3. Before making a telephone call, do you ever rehearse what you are going to say? Why?

4. What would constitute a “perfect” day for you?

5. When did you last sing to yourself? To someone else?

6. If you were able to live to the age of 90 and retain either the mind or body of a 30-year-old for the last 60 years of your life, which would you want?

7. Do you have a secret hunch about how you will die?

8. Name three things you and your partner appear to have in common.

9. For what in your life do you feel most grateful?

10. If you could change anything about the way you were raised, what would it be?

11. Take four minutes and tell your partner your life story in as much detail as possible.

12. If you could wake up tomorrow having gained any one quality or ability, what would it be?

Set II


13. If a crystal ball could tell you the truth about yourself, your life, the future or anything else, what would you want to know?

14. Is there something that you’ve dreamed of doing for a long time? Why haven’t you done it?

15. What is the greatest accomplishment of your life?

16. What do you value most in a friendship?

17. What is your most treasured memory?

18. What is your most terrible memory?

19. If you knew that in one year you would die suddenly, would you change anything about the way you are now living? Why?

20. What does friendship mean to you?

21. What roles do love and affection play in your life?

22. Alternate sharing something you consider a positive characteristic of your partner. Share a total of five items.

23. How close and warm is your family? Do you feel your childhood was happier than most other people’s?

24. How do you feel about your relationship with your mother?

Set III

25. Make three true “we” statements each. For instance, “We are both in this room feeling ..."

26. Complete this sentence: “I wish I had someone with whom I could share ..."

27. If you were going to become a close friend with your partner, please share what would be important for him or her to know.

28. Tell your partner what you like about them; be very honest this time, saying things that you might not say to someone you’ve just met.

29. Share with your partner an embarrassing moment in your life.

30. When did you last cry in front of another person? By yourself?

31. Tell your partner something that you like about them already.

32. What, if anything, is too serious to be joked about?

33. If you were to die this evening with no opportunity to communicate with anyone, what would you most regret not having told someone? Why haven’t you told them yet?

34. Your house, containing everything you own, catches fire. After saving your loved ones and pets, you have time to safely make a final dash to save any one item. What would it be? Why?

35. Of all the people in your family, whose death would you find most disturbing? Why?

36. Share a personal problem and ask your partner’s advice on how he or she might handle it. Also, ask your partner to reflect back to you how you seem to be feeling about the problem you have chosen.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

 

 

wsar storm cancellations for SouthCoast, and Rhode Island

E-MAIL WSAR here to report storm cancellations.

 

Use your password to confirm.

 

ACTIVE CANCELLATIONS

 

Use your password to confirm.

 

When the weather turns bad

stay tuned to 1480 WSAR!

 

Fall River Mayor's Office:

508-324-2600 & 324-2601

 

Snow Storm Station:

508-324-2801 & 207-2584

 

DPW: 

508-324-2761 & 324-2760

 

Traffic Department:

508-324-2577 & 324-2579

 

NSTAR

1-800-592-2000

 

NATIONAL GRID

1-800-465-1212
1-800-322-3223


STUDIO:  508-673-1480

OFFICE:  508-678-9727




BKs Beacon Tavern

To report breaking news click here

 

To tell us about a calender or event listing click here


Visitor Polls
What do you think of Fall River's snow removal efforts?
Excellent
Good
Fair
Poor
Add a Comment
(Fields are Optional)
Name:
Email:
Your email address is never published.
View Results

ABC Health Feed

LinkedUpRadio Envisionwise Web Services