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RODRIGO BUENDIA/AFP/Getty Images(QUITO, Ecuador) -- At the start of a weeklong visit to his native continent, Pope Francis arrived to a red carpet reception at Quito's main airport, where Ecuador's socialist president Rafael Correa greeted him on the tarmac.

But as the pope's motorcade proceeded into the city, many along the sidelines voiced their disapproval of Correa, giving him thumbs down.

For this first Latin American pope, the trip is almost a homecoming. He is not visiting his home country Argentina on this trip. Instead he will travel to Ecuador, Bolivia and Paraguay.

This is his first visit to Spanish speaking countries here. All three countries he is visiting are overwhelmingly Catholic and among the poorest on the continent.

At Quito airport, Pope Francis said he feels "particular concern for our brothers and sisters who are most fragile and minorities who are most vulnerable."

The large open air masses he is scheduled to hold during his visit are expected to draw millions of people. The pope also plans to take time to visit a Bolivian prison and a slum in Paraguay, making the effort to connect with those at the margins of society.

Pope Francis took time to meet each of the 75 journalists traveling with him on the papal plane, accepting presents from some reporters and blessing rosaries and other items they brought with them.

One Bolivian reporter gave Francis locally made chocolates with his face on them. The pope beamed as he agreed to take a selfie with her.

But the trip will be physically grueling for the 78-year-old leader of the Catholic faith. He is scheduled to make nine stops in seven days, making this his longest busiest foreign trip yet.

One stop, in Bolivian capital La Paz, is at an altitude of 4,000 meters, equivalent to some of the tallest mountains in the United States.

As a young man, Pope Francis lost part of one lung due to an illness, and church officials acknowledged some concern about altitude sickness.

According to Vatican officials, the pope has expressed an interest in trying a local remedy popular among indigenous people in the Andes mountains: coca leaves.

Local residents chew them or drink them in tea to alleviate the shortness of breath and queeziness that can result from spending even a few short hours at altitude.

But coca leaves are illegal in much of the developed world, banned as a controlled substance because they are the raw ingredient of cocaine.

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Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, carries Princess Charlotte of Cambridge as they arrive at the Church of St Mary Magdalene on July 5, 2015 in King's Lynn, England (Photo by Matt Dunham - WPA Pool /Getty Images)(KING'S LYNN, England) -- Princess Charlotte Elizabeth Diana was christened on Sunday in a ceremony at St. Mary Magdalene Church on the Sandringham estate of her great-grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II.

The 2-month-old daughter of Prince William and Princess Kate arrived to the church in a stroller pushed by Kate.

The family was greeted by well-wishers who had gathered outside the church to see the fourth-in-line to the British throne.

Kate then picked up Charlotte to carry her inside.

William held George's hand as they entered and left the church, and George at one point waved to the crowds.

Charlotte, born May 2 in London, wore the same christening gown worn by her big brother, Prince George, at his christening. The gown, remade by the queen's dresser, Angela Kelly, in 2008, is an exact replica of the gown first commissioned by Queen Victoria 174 years ago and has been used for every generation of royal infants.

Duchess Kate wore a white Alexander McQueen ensemble to the ceremony, while Prince George sported a white shirt with red shorts.

The queen wore a rose Angela Kelly dress and hat.

Joining the family for Princess Charlotte’s christening were the queen, Prince Charles and Camilla, and Kate’s family, siblings Pippa and James, and her parents, Carole and Michael Middleton.

Charlotte’s uncle, Prince Harry, missed the christening because he is spending the summer in Africa.

Also in attendance were Charlotte’s godparents and their spouses.

Prince William and Princess Kate announced Princess Charlotte's five godparents this weekend: Kate's cousin Adam Middleton, William's cousin The Hon. Laura Fellowes, and three of the couple's friends, Thomas van Straubenzee, Sophie Carter and James Meade.

The invited guests celebrated the christening in a place of special significance to Princess Charlotte’s paternal grandmother, the late Princess Diana, who was baptized in the same church in 1961. In choosing St. Mary Magdalene Church for Charlotte’s christening, Prince William and Kate made a poignant nod to William’s mother, as they did when they selected their daughter's name, Princess Charlotte Elizabeth Diana.

St. Mary Magdalene Church is also the parish church of the queen on the Sandringham estate and is where the royal family spends Christmas every year.

The church is also close to Anmer Hall, the 10-bedroom home also on the queen’s Sandringham estate, where William, Kate, Charlotte and her big brother, Prince George, have been spending most of their time since Charlotte’s May 2 birth.

The Most Rev. Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, who also presided over Prince George's christening, conducted the ceremony.

Princess Charlotte was baptized with water from the River Jordan poured from the priceless silver "Lily Font," which is housed in the Tower of London with the rest of the crown jewels. The silver baptism bowl is 17-inches high and 16-inches wide, decorated with gilded lilies and ivy and was commissioned by Queen Victoria in 1840.

It is supported by the lily-shaped stem, which gives the font its name, on a bed of acanthus leaves. The scrolled sides of the high base are decorated with three cherubs playing lyres, and the royal arms of Queen Victoria and the joint arms of Queen Victoria and Albert Prince Consort.

A gold-jeweled Bible, with more than 500 sapphires, rubies and opals, an early-1900s gift from the American Wanamaker family, is also housed inside the queen's local church on the Sandringham estate.

Documenting the historical day for the royal family is Mario Testino, the world-renowned photographer whom William and Kate tapped to take the official photographs of the christening party.

Testino, 60, photographed the engagement photos for Princess Kate and Prince William, and was also chosen by the late Princess Diana selected to photograph her for Vanity Fair.

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Polling station officials count the ballots at a polling station in Athens on July 5, 2015. (LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)(ATHENS, Greece) -- The polls have closed in Greece in a historic referendum that could determine the country’s future in Europe, its currency and impact the global economy.

Greece’s government has cast the vote as one about increased unpopular austerity measures.

Opponents argue it has more to do with Greece’s place in the European Union and the Eurozone.

Surveys leading up to the referendum show voters almost evenly split.

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Purestock/Thinkstock(RAQQA, Syria) -- America military officials said on Sunday that at least 10 Islamic State militants were killed US-led airstrikes targeting the extremist group’s capital.

Dozens of others were wounded in the attack on the Syrian city of Raqqa, which serves as the headquarters of the Islamic State caliphate.

Warplanes reportedly targeted Islamic State buildings and supply routes into the city.

In recent weeks, the region north of Raqqa has been the scene of intense fighting between the Islamic State and Kurdish forces back by coalition airstrikes.

Last month Kurdish fighters captured a town on the Turkish-Syrian border once controlled by the Islamic State.

The capture of Tal Abyad and other towns has since cut off a crucial supply line to Raqqa.

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zabelin/iStock/Thinkstock(BAGHDAD) -- The Islamic State released a new video on Sunday showing dozens of Syrian regime forces being executed by teenage boys.

In the video, the Syrian soldiers are on their knees as the boys prepare to kill them.

The mass execution took place at an ancient Roman amphitheater in the eastern Syrian city of Palmyra.

The extremist group frequently documents its executions on videos, which are then posted to its extensive social media network.

In recent weeks the ISIS militants have posted videos of victims being slowly drowned and beheaded.

The hardline group’s penchant for public executions has evoked the condemnation of the international community and the rebel groups fighting them.

In an apparent role reversal, one rebel group recently filmed the execution of a group of ISIS fighters which had been captured.

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Photo by SSPL/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- A NASA spacecraft traveling to Pluto experienced an "anomaly," the space organization said Sunday.

The New Horizons spacecraft lost communication with Earth on Saturday, NASA said. Communication was eventually re-established and NASA determined that the spacecraft is "healthy."

In total, communication was lost between 1:54 pm ET and 3:15pm ET on Saturday.

The craft's autopilot recognized the issue and switched itself to the backup computer, placing it in "safe mode" and reinitiating communication with NASA.

NASA is now working to return New Horizons to its original flight plan. Recovery could take multiple days, due to the "round trip communication delay that results from operating a spacecraft almost three billion miles from Earth," NASA said. During that time, the craft will be unable to collect science data.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The U.S. celebrates its independence and strikes against one of its major enemies.

The state department announced late Saturday that coalition forces had launched "the most sustained set of airstrikes to date" against ISIS.

According to a tweet from Ambassador, Deputy Special Presidential Envoy to the Global Coalition to Counter ISIL Brett McGurk, the 16 airstrikes would inhibit ISIS from operating inside Raqqa, ISIS' self-proclaimed capital.

The news of the airstrikes came as a fireworks viewing party took place at the south lawn of the White House among men and women in the military.

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iStock/Thinkstock(ROME) -- An Italian politician goes on a hunger strike to push for gay marriage in Italy.

Italian politician Ivan Scalfarotto wants equal rights for the LGBT community in Italy.

Inspired by the U.S.'s decision to legalize gay marriage, Scalfarotto says he will continue his hunger strike until he sees some kind of change of position from Italy on gay rights. He also says that the country is the only Western European country that refuses to recognize LGBT couples.

Some Italians blame Italy's inaction on the Vatican. Scalfarotto says it's no excuse.

"I don’t want to give the establishment in my country an alibi because the church is very powerful in Spain, Portugal, Malta and Ireland," said Scalfarotto.

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CGinspiration/iStock/Thinkstock(VIENNA) -- According to diplomats, Iran and the P5 1 nations have reached an agreement on lifting sanctions against Iran as part of a larger nuclear deal.

The deal was approved by experts on both sides, though a senior administration official says that "there will remain some open issues that can only be decided by ministers." One of those issues may be determining when the sanctions would be lifted.

The nations have been working on a possible nuclear deal for months, with President Obama saying earlier this week that he was hopeful an agreement could be reached.

"There's still some hard negotiations to take place," Obama said, "but ultimately it's going to be up to the Iranians to determine whether or not they meet the requirements that the international community has set forth."

Obama also said that he would be willing to walk away from a deal if Iran did not agree to conditions that would block the nation's path to a nuclear weapon.

Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif posted a YouTube video on Friday saying that the two sides "have never been closer to a lasting outcome," but that the P5 1 nations must choose between "agreement or coercion."

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Turkish coast guard rescue 10 month-old baby Melda Ilgin as she drifts a kilometer out to sea on a sea buoy in Ayvacik district of Canakkale province, Turkey on July 3, 2015. (Photo by Hanife Erdinc/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)(AYVACIK, Turkey) -- A baby girl was reportedly rescued by the Turkish coast guard after she drifted out to sea.

The 10-month-old was in an inflatable crib when she floated about half a mile, the BBC reported.

The incident happened off the coast of Ayvacik, which is on the western tip of Turkey.

The girl's parents didn't realize she was gone until other beachgoers told them, the BBC reported, attributing the details to a state-run news agency.

The BBC did not report the girl's condition.

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PeterHermesFurian/iStock/Thinkstock(WILLEMSTAD, Curacao) -- The family of a Texas woman who went missing during a snorkeling expedition in the Caribbean more than a week ago is holding onto hope that she is still alive.

Amanda Waller, 29, was snorkeling with friends off the coast of Curacao when she told them that she was heading back to shore. Though described as a strong swimmer, she never made it to the shore.

Waller's husband told ABC News that the group takes a vacation every summer. They chose Curacao, he says, because they had heard that "the diving and the beaches were beautiful."

"We're hoping of course that she's found alive," friend Terri Youngs said, "but...either way, I think her family deserves closure with knowing exactly what happened."

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alexeys/iStock/Thinkstock(ISTANBUL) -- More troops are being sent to Turkey’s border with Syria.

Turkish officials are sending more troops along Turkey’s border with Syria as fighting increases in the area.

Reports are also stating that Turkish leaders may be getting ready to invade the country.

Turkish President  Recep Tayyip Erdogan has so far tried to play down ideas of an invasion into Syria, but he reportedly may want to create a “buffer zone” along the border extending several miles.

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Enrico Giuseppe Agostoni/iStock/Thinkstock(MILAN) -- A Holocaust memorial is now the temporary refuge for a group of desperate migrants.

Trying to escape conflict and poverty, African migrants who have crossed from North Africa to Italy are setting up camp in Milan’s central train station on platform 21.

At the same spot 50 years ago, Nazis were sending Jews to extermination camps. Now since 2013, an area under the platform has served as a memorial for Italian Jews who died in the Holocaust. 

The museum on the site has now been turned into a shelter by the city of Milan and its Jewish community. Migrants who are travelling are also allowed to take showers.

This isn’t the only site where migrants are camping out.

As they continue to make their way to northern Europe, many can be found sleeping in other Italian train stations.

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Kegan Rothman caught a 600-pound sturgeon in Chilliwack, British Columbia, on June 29, 2015.(Great River Fishing Adventures)(CHILLIWACK, British Columbia) -- There's The Old Man and the Sea and then there's the young boy and the river -- and the latter is a tale that even Hemingway would approve of.

After a nearly two-hour struggle, Kegan Rothman, 9, reeled in a great white sturgeon estimated at 600 pounds with the help of his father and a fishing guide on June 29 in Chilliwack, British Columbia, an official told ABC News on Friday.

“It is the most excitement I’ve ever had with a fish. It was so hard to hold onto the rod. I thought the fish was going to pull me into the water,” Kegan told Great River Fishing Adventures.

On his first day out on the water on vacation, Kegan’s rod dipped into the water and he didn’t back down from the ensuing fight.

He, his father and Great River Fishing Adventures guide Ben Trainer spent the next hour and 45 minutes reeling in their catch in a “nearly impossible feat," said Matthew Clive, a spokesman for Great River Fishing Adventures.

“I’ve been a professional fishing guide on the Fraser [River] for 11 years and have fished these rivers my whole life. This is one of my largest fish I have help[ed] a client catch,” Trainer told Great River Fishing Adventures.

“With the size of this fish, I’d bet it’s over 75 years old,” he added.

Kegan, only 4-feet tall and from New Jersey, got the 10-foot long fish near shore, where Trainer examined it and estimated its weight to be 600 pounds.

The sturgeon was then released back into the river.

Before Monday’s new personal record, Kegan said he had caught a 120-pound sailfish on vacation in Mexico.

Great River Fishing Adventures has caught and released four monster-sized sturgeons in the past five years, company officials said, noting the largest weighed in at 1,100 pounds.


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Anya Fernald, the CEO of California-based Belcampo Meat Co., looks over cuts of meat being cooked with the "asado" grilling technique in Uruguay. (ABC News)(MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay) -- Anya Fernald had been traveling for days, making the trip from her home in northern California to a place three hours outside of Montevideo, Uruguay, all for a taste of what she believes is the best barbeque in the world.

Fernald, a butcher, rancher and restaurateur, travels to Gaucho country, the land of the famous South American cowboys, to find inspiration for her cooking.

“The country of Uruguay is the land of meat and this is where it all starts,” she said.

But she’s not talking about a rib-eye steak or filet mignon.

“Seeing that fatty intestine and how it gave that great crust to the chorizo is amazing,” she said, watching two asaderos work the meat over an open flame. “We can definitely mess around with it.”

The Gauchos, Fernald said, have what a lot of people consider as the best grilling technique in the world, called “asado.”

“It’s going to be a very, very tender way of cooking because essentially it’s a slow smoke,” she said. “Asaderos is a very traditional role. They make the fire, they cook all the meat, they go very slowly and it’s really an all-day affair.”

Asado was originated by the Gauchos out on the range who would slaughter a steer and eat as much meat as they could for two days, everything from the loins to the off-cuts or offal, meaning intestines, heart, blood and brains.

“You eat the blood and the organs first and then the big cuts,” Fernald said, because the offal has a richer taste.

Their slow-cooking technique is what Fernald said enables the Gauchos to get a tasty meal out of cuts most Americans would reject.

“A lot of these cuts, in the American tradition, we would be cooking them with moisture, like braising them, because they’re kind of tough cuts,” Fernald said. “This way, with this very, very low heat, they’re essentially doing very slow cooking, which makes the flavor really come out.”

Since most of us don’t have 12 hours to make dinner, Fernald’s latest plan is to package these dishes and sell them back at home.

“Looks spectacular,” Fernald said, talking about the beef intestines stuffed with chorizo. “I think people will freak out about that.”

Believe it or not, Fernald was once a vegetarian, but said she then drank a gallon of whole milk a day and started eating only fatty meats and lost weight. Now she is all about the meat, and not just any meat, but raw and fatty meat from all parts of the animal – foods we’ve often been told to stay away from.

“My baby... teethed on lamb ribs and goat ribs, she loves goat,” Fernald said. “We eat a lot of raw beef at home. Raw beef was her first food when she was four months old. She loves it to this day.”

And Fernald is making it her business to get everyone else on board. Back home in California, she’s building a meat empire with a string of butcher shops and restaurants called Belcampo Meat Co., where they insist that meat is more than just chicken breasts and lean steaks.

“If you want to use the whole animal, heart is a very edible part of it,” said Bronwen Hanna-Korpi, President of Belcampo Meat Co. “It’s just high in protein, and low on fat, so it’s going to be a great way to get a boost of protein. It’s superfood.”

One of Fernald’s workers, Billie Joe, the apprentice butcher at Belcampo Meat Co.’s Santa Monica shop, was hard at work making “lardo butter” from pig fat.

“It’s insanely delicious,” she said. “It’s the craziest, yummy taste you didn’t know existed.”

Fernald scours the world in search of new recipes. She’s traveled to Northern Sweden where she tasted reindeer broth, and said it’s “the most delicious tasting broth” she ever had. Next up on her list? Southeast Asia, where she would like to search for the best way for making curry paste with fermented bison skin and then Scotland to try mutton.

While many of these dishes might sound unappetizing to the American palate, Fernald said that’s because we have lost touch with the way we should be cooking.

“I think that there are a lot of issues in America… that are related to us moving away from a historical way of eating,” she said.

In Uruguay, the best cuts of beef are exported all over the world, but locals save stringy cuts for themselves, and Asado is their secret.

“We would consider cuts that are too tough to grill and those are the basis of the whole grilling culture [in Uruguay],” Fernald said.

She knows it’s not for everyone, but she has already made progress. Her chef at her shop in Santa Monica said her raw lamb and lard on toast are already big sellers.

“Deliciousness wins,” Fernald said. “Conquer the heart through the stomach… make something really, really amazing tasting… make the change delicious.”


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