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Can-West Corporate Air Charters Ltd(FORT MCMURRAY, Alberta) -- The devastating wildfires sweeping across the Fort McMurray area of Alberta, Canada, have been captured on video.

The video, from Can-West Corporate Air Charters Ltd., shows a building filled with smoke from the wildfires. The smoke increases and surrounds the building, as a burst of orange suddenly covers the entire shot. Flames begin to appear on the side of the road near the building.

The smoke continues to surround the building throughout the rest of the video, with bursts of orange sporadically throughout.

More than than 80,000 people have been forced to evacuate their homes and the fire has spread to 200,000 acres -- or 10 times the size of Manhattan.

The Alberta provincial government has declared a state of emergency. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

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iStock/ThinkstockBy ABC News' Terry Moran

(PYONGYANG, North Korea) -- For the first time in a generation, North Korea's ruling Workers Party gathered Friday to hail its leader and plot a course for this intensely isolated country's future.

It's a showpiece event for this regime. And a strange one.

On Friday morning, thousands of delegates from across North Korea gathered in the giant "April 25th House of Culture."

We joined more than a hundred foreign reporters invited here to cover the party congress -- the first since 1980.

As startled locals looked on, the press corps trooped down the long avenue leading to the grand April 25th hall -- and stopped across the street from the hall where the party congress had just begun.

We waited to cross that street. And waited. Our ever-present minders from the North Korean government said nothing to us. We waited some more. Rain fell.

An hour passed. And then, instead of crossing the street, we were directed back to our buses, and returned to the hotel.

We did not find out what was actually happening inside the party congress until the local 10 p.m. news, which was delivered by an anchor who seemed almost unable to hold back her tears as she delivered her report.

The highlight: Kim Jong-Un, the young, portly Supreme Leader who represents the third generation of his family to rule with an iron fist over this nation, had arrived in the grand hall to frenzied applause.

The scene that the news program showed on the nation's television screens was breathtaking -- in a Stalinist sort of way.

Thousands of delegates roared in wave after wave of coordinated enthusiasm. The camera cut from one perfect vista of unified worship in the cavernous auditorium to another, a field of hands banging together in applause for minutes on end.

It's unlike anything else in the post-Cold War world.

And at the front, Kim Jong-Un took it all in. He spoke at length, boasting of North Korea's growing nuclear prowess.

In January, North Korea conducted its fourth test of a nuclear weapon. And it is working hard to develop ballistic missiles capable of striking much of the continental United States.

"Unprecedented results have been accomplished," Kim declared. More frenzied applause.

This party congress is dominating life in Pyongyang right now.

The city has been groomed and festooned with propaganda in anticipation of this meeting. There's new paint on the buildings that line major avenues (though a block behind them, all is grey). The streets have been immaculately swept -- not a speck of litter anywhere.

And everyone we meet tells us how proud and thrilled they are about their congress and their supreme leader.

The young Kim Jong-Un -- his exact age is not publicly known, but outside analysts estimate he was born in 1983 or 1984 -- is trying to make his own mark on this country.

His plan: Make North Korea's nuclear deterrent irreversible. And at the same time, develop the economy here, broken by years of mismanagement and damaged by a decade of United Nations sanctions.

So, to emphasize the economic message, the corps of foreign reporters were taken in the afternoon to a wire factory. There may be no other wire factory like it in the world.

The machinery is ordinary enough -- much of it looking like it dated from the 1950s, when the plant was built.

But this is the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. A worker's paradise. And the regime uses this place to show how happy workers are here.

There's a perfectly groomed soccer field outside the entrance, and when we arrived, a few workers were doing one-on-two drills.

Adjacent to the factory is a "Worker's Health Center." Here we saw men's and women's hair salons -- one customer obligingly getting coiffed at each shop.

At the libraries, one worker obligingly at each desk. At swimming pools, adults obligingly doing laps in each of the lanes, little children obligingly squealing with delight in the kiddie pool. And in an incredible, room-sized sauna, a few workers obligingly lounged and played cards.

All while our cameras rolled.

When North Korea wants to get a message out, it doesn't scrimp on the props.

In the coming days, there will be more speeches, torchlight parades, military displays, and, some observers speculate, another nuclear test.

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Stocktrek Images/Thinkstock(KABUL, Afghanistan) — Sixty Afghan hostages held prisoner by the Taliban in a southern province in Afghanistan have been rescued by Afghan military commandos and an elite counterterrorism unit.

"Afghan special security forces liberated over 60 prisoners from an illegally-run Taliban prison in Bar Now Zad Village in Now Zad District of Helmand province last night," according to a statement released by Resolute Support, the NATO training mission in Afghanistan.

"The Ktah Khas, Afghanistan’s national-level counterterrorism unit, and an Afghan army commando unit jointly conducted this successful mission," the statement said. "Coalition forces supported their Afghan partners in a train, advise and assist role."

Under the cover of darkness, Afghan military helicopters from the Afghan Special Missing Wing (Unit 777) transported the Afghan special operations forces to the village.

Two Taliban fighters were killed in Thursday night's assault and numerous others were wounded and detained. There were no Afghan military casualties.

The freed prisoners were flown to the neighboring province of Kandahar where they were turned over to Afghan authorities.

It is unclear if U.S. military forces provided support to the raid. Last December the same units conducted a similar rescue at another Taliban prison in Now Zad that freed 60 prisoners. The U.S. supported that rescue mission by providing overhead drone surveillance during the raid.

A longtime Taliban stronghold, the Afghan military has been hard pressed to push back a resurgent Taliban in Helmand province. Late last year several hundred American military forces returned to Helmand to begin retraining Afghan army forces. American forces do not participate in joint military operations.

U.S. special operations forces do, however, conduct joint operations with their Afghan counterparts as part of their mission, which brings them closer to the front lines.

In early January, Staff Sgt. Matthew McClintock, 30, was killed during an extended firefight in Marjah in Helmand province while helping Afghan forces battle Taliban fighters. Two others were wounded.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Can love survive in a place filled with hatred, conflicts and wars?

That is a question that Palestinian director Ali Abu Yaseen wants to explore with his play Romeo and Juliet in Gaza, which has opened to audiences in the Gaza Strip.

The play is not set in Verona, Italy, like Shakespeare’s original version -- but in a refugee camp in Gaza, which is home to about 1.3 million registered refugees. Yousef and Suha, the star-crossed lovers in the play, are from two feuding Palestinian political families, representing the deep rift between the ruling Hamas group and the Fatah party.

“Love is one of the most important things in life,” director Abu Yaseen told ABC News. “In the end love fails in the play because of the struggle between the two families.”

The conflict between Hamas and Fatah means that some families in Gaza might oppose a marriage between the daughter of a Fatah member and the son of a Hamas supporter.

That is the case for Yousef and Suha. They do not die at the end as in Shakespeare’s tragedy. Instead, Yousef leaves Gaza by sea. He promises Suha that he will send her a ticket and a passport so they can be reunited again.

“Most young people in Gaza dream of leaving, so we had Romeo leave at the end,” said Abu Yaseen. All the scenes in the play are inspired by real events in Gaza, he said.

A big theme in the play is the struggles facing young Gazans.

The youth unemployment rate in Gaza is 60 percent -- the highest in the Middle East, according to The World Bank. Since 2007, when the Islamist group Hamas seized control of the Gaza Strip, Israel has imposed a blockade on Gaza. This means that Gazans live with daily electricity cuts and limited access to food, water and gas. It's also virtually impossible for them to leave the Strip.

“Gaza is filled with talented people, but we don’t have the simplest things that most citizens have access to,” said Abu Yaseen. “We have a whole generation that was raised knowing that electricity is only available for about six hours per day. It is normal that a person can go to the movie theater or travel or that a university graduate can find a job. But not in Gaza.”

The high youth unemployment rate is illustrated in a scene where young men are sitting in a coffee shop with nothing else to do but play cards and chat.

Another theme is that Palestinians are scattered around the world. One character, an old man, has waited for 40 years for the return of the woman he loves. She fled Gaza following the 1967 War, which in real life forced hundreds of thousands of Palestinian to flee.

“I hear real stories that no one would believe are true,” said Abu Yaseen. “Sometimes I write something based on what I hear but then I have to erase it because no one would believe it.”

Abu Yaseen has lived in Gaza all his life. Before the blockade he used to be able to travel and participate in national and international festivals. Now, he gets invitations but misses all the events because of the travel restrictions. That means that his audience is now limited to people who live in Gaza.

“It is like someone who has a very nice voice but is singing only for his wife and children in their living room,” he said. “Imagine that you are only writing for your family and friends.”

In Gaza, it is free to see the play and many people from different age groups and backgrounds have been in the audience at Gaza’s Al-Mishal theater, he said. More performances are coming. Gaza does not offer many attractions, and Abu Yaseen said that theater is one of the few and important ones.

“People in Gaza are just sitting in their homes,” he said. “Theater gives us hope. Many people told me that they started to love Gaza and love life again after watching the play. They said ‘it made us feel like we are humans.’”

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iStock/Thinkstock(FORT MCMURRAY, Alberta) — As intense wildfires decimate the landscape in the Fort McMurray area of Alberta, Canada, forcing close to 90,000 to evacuate, one family captured their heartbreaking evacuation on video.

"Oh my god, Steve, our house is gonna burn down," Erica Decker says through sobs on the video she later uploaded to Facebook.

"Is mom out?" Decker asks.

"Yes, she's gone. She left," says Steven Pearce.

Canadian broadcaster CBC reported that Decker took the video as she and her family fled Fort McMurray on Tuesday evening. Decker, her husband, young daughter and three cats are now safe in Edmonton, according to CBC.

"We lost everything. We barely got out," she told CBC News.

Officials said close to 90,000 residents have fled their homes as the fire gained new ground, covering around 200,000 acres — about 10 times the size of Manhattan. Many evacuees are having to stay in work camps, homes and temporary shelters around Alberta — locations with limited supplies including food and gasoline.

Evacuation orders are in effect for four Alberta communities as the wildfire rages out of control, a representative with the Alberta Wildfire Prevention and Enforcement told ABC News.

The Alberta government announced the banning of fire and incendiary targets across the province to reduce the risks of more blazes as the hot and dry weather persists.

The wildfire is expected to continue on its path for the next several days.

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Alberta Police(FORT MCMURRAY, Alberta) — Neighborhoods in Fort McMurray, Alberta were reduced to rubble as a raging wildfire continues to ravage the oil sands area — leaving tens of thousands of people displaced.

Video only begins to capture the scorched areas littered with debris and rubble. Communities devastated by a wildfire so large and intense that it can be seen from space.

 

This video from earlier is from the Thickwood neighbourhood. Wood Buffalo subdivision #ymmfire #ymm pic.twitter.com/49wY4VLEDP

— BreannaKarstensSmith (@BreannaCTV) May 5, 2016

 

Officials said close to 90,000 residents have fled their homes as the fire gained new ground, covering around 200,000 acres — about 10 times the size of Manhattan. Many evacuees are having to stay in work camps, homes and temporary shelters around Alberta — locations with limited supplies including food and gasoline.

Evacuation orders are in effect for four Alberta communities as the wildfire rages out of control, a representative with the Alberta Wildfire Prevention and Enforcement told ABC News.

The Alberta government announced the banning of fire and incendiary targets across the province to reduce the risks of more blazes as the hot and dry weather persisted.

The wildfire is expected to continue on its path for the next several days.

Fort McMurray is known for its massive oil sands deposits and is surrounded by wilderness.


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iStock/Thinkstock(PARIS) -- An attempt to curb traffic fatalities by making France's driving test harder has hit a wall, after authorities found four out of five flunked it.

The revamped exam has been pulled after its launch just Monday, the Daily Mail reports, when "oblique" new questions and anti-cheating measures spiked the failure rate from around 30 percent to a whopping 83 percent.

The exam featured questions based on videos, and True or False statements like: "At 80kph, the visual field of a driver [is] sixty degrees."

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iStock/Thinkstock(FT. LAUDERDALE, Fla.) -- Seven people were transported to a hospital in Fort Lauderdale, Florida after an Allegiant Air jet hit turbulence returning from Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, first responders told ABC News. The flight was bound for Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Allegiant Air's Flight 7001, a charter operated on behalf of Apple Vacations, encountered “unreported moderate clear air turbulence” Thursday afternoon and was diverted to Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International airport, according to the company.

When the Airbus A319 landed, emergency personnel assisted four flight attendants and three passengers who had suffered multiple injuries, from bruises and lacerations to head injuries -- none life-threatening.

According to airline spokesperson Jessica Wheeler, a nurse aboard the flight assisted crew members following the turbulence, and all passengers were “ambulatory” by the time they were transported to Broward Health Medical Center.


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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- An airstrike on a refugee camp in northern Syria has reportedly killed at least 28 people, according to the BBC.

Tents at the Kamouna camp near Sarmada near the Turkish boarder were completely destroyed.

Some unconfirmed reports say the attack was brought about by Syrian or Russian warplanes, according to the BBC.

Thursday's strike comes shortly after the Syrian military and non-jihadist rebel forces agreed to extend a truce.

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iStock/Thinkstock(ALBERTA, Canada) -- Evacuation orders are now in effect for four Alberta communities as a wildfire rages out of control, a representative with the Alberta Wildfire Prevention and Enforcement told ABC News Thursday.

Some 88,000 residents have fled their homes as the fire gains new ground, now covering 85,000 hectares -- about 10 times the size of Manhattan -- senior manager Chad Morrison said. More than 350 firefighters are on scene, accompanied by 16 air tankers and 10 helicopters. A thousand more firefighters are on standby, as officials monitor the situation, described as unpredictable.

"The fire behavior is so extreme and conditions are so volatile, we want to make sure we are bringing in resources when it's safe to do so," Morrison said.

The burgeoning blaze has reportedly created its own weather system, including lighting. Fire crews must also contend with 40 mph wind gusts.

Extreme wildfire in Fort McMurray area that's burned ~19,000 acres is seen by our satellites https://t.co/cW5rWrBGzt pic.twitter.com/C4IZ0wUvBy

— NASA (@NASA) May 5, 2016

"Firefighters being able to work safely is a challenge," Morrison said, adding that the main priority right now is human safety, and the protection of homes and critical infrastructure.

Fears are also mounting that the fire could possibly reach nearby oil sands, prompting oil prices to surge today.

"We don't believe that [the oil fields] are threatened at this time, but, of course, that's a concern," Morrison said.

The wildfire is expected to continue on its path for the next three days. Morrison said he is hoping a much-needed shower of rain will put it out, or at least slow it down. Firefighters, however, are beginning to make progress, he said.

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iStock/Thinkstock(PALMYRA, Syria) -- An orchestra from one of Russia’s most famous theaters Thursday played a concert in a Roman amphitheater in the ancient city of Palmyra to triumph its recapture by Syrian government forces.

Syrian troops retook Palmyra from ISIS militants in late-March under the cover of Russian airstrikes and artillery.

Thursday, St. Petersburg’s Mariinsky Theater Orchestra performed on Palmyra’s 2,000-year-old Roman stage in a surreal scene among the desert ruins, which ISIS had used as an execution site. The orchestra played Bach and a symphony by Sergei Prokofiev to a crowd of Russian and Syrian soldiers and civilians, beneath a facade where the Roman Emperor Nero had once ordered a statue of himself placed.

The face of Russia’s President Vladimir Putin appeared on a screen inside the amphitheater by video-link to address them. “Thank you for this surprising humanitarian action,” Putin told the crowd.

The concert, titled “A Prayer for Palmyra,” was broadcast live by Russian state television. The concert’s conductor, Valery Gergiev, told the audience the concert was protesting “against barbarians who have destroyed monuments of world culture.”

Palmyra is a UNESCO World Heritage site, the sprawling well-preserved remains of an ancient city that was once Syria’s most popular tourist attraction. ISIS forces seized the city last May and began dynamiting some of its architectural sites that the terror group believes were idolatrous, causing extensive damage.

After Palmyra was retaken, the Russian military de-mined the ruins, removing thousands of ISIS booby traps, according to the country’s defense ministry.

Moscow and the Syrian government have trumpeted Palmyra’s recapture as a symbol of how their campaign is rescuing civilization in Syria after five years of savage warfare. Thursday's concert seemed intended to underscore that idea.

Putin said the concert was meant as as sign of hope “for the deliverance of modern civilization from this terrible plague, from international terrorism.”

But even as the Russian orchestra played, fighting continued across Syria, with reports that an airstrike had struck a refugee camp, killing dozens. Meanwhile, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad pledged that his forces would eventually achieve victory over rebels in Aleppo, despite a 48-hour truce brokered by the United States there Wednesday. The comments suggested Assad had little intention of engaging seriously in peace negotiations with rebels that had all but collapsed last month.

Monitoring groups estimate over 400,000 people have been killed in Syria since 2011, the great majority by forces loyal to Assad, many through indiscriminate barrel bombing and airstrikes. Leaked documents acquired by international rights groups have shown tens of thousands have been brutally tortured by Assad’s security services, beaten, suffocated, electrocuted, some with limbs drilled, their eyes gouged out.

Russia has been supporting Assad’s government with a ferocious air campaign targeting rebels, as well as with advisers on the ground. Russian aircraft in Syria have been accused by rights groups of indiscriminately bombing hospitals in rebel areas and causing hundreds of civilian casualties. Rebel groups last week blamed Russia for airstrikes on a hospital in Aleppo that killed at least 27 people.

Staging musical concerts on the sites of its military successes is becoming a signature move for the Kremlin. Valery Gergiev, the conductor at Palmyra known for his outspoken support of Putin, also led the orchestra when it played in the breakaway republic of South Ossetia after Russian troops routed Georgian troops in a 2008 war there.

Popular Russian singers have also held concerts in Crimea and eastern Ukraine after pro-Russian rule was established there.

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iStock/Thinkstock(JERUSALEM) -- Israel stood silent for two minutes on Thursday to mark Holocaust Memorial Day.

Communities were still as sirens blared across the country in remembrance of those who suffered in the Holocaust.

Israeli leaders attended ceremonies at parliament and Jerusalem's Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial, among other venues.

An estimated 12 million people, including 1.5 million children, died across Nazi Germany over a 12-year period from 1933-1945. Six million Jews alone perished in Nazi death camps during World War II.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- "Severe and unexpected" turbulence injured 31 passengers on a flight to Jakarta Wednesday, sending nine to the hospital, Etihad Airways confirms.

The Airbus A330, en route from Abu Dhabi to Jakarta, encountered bumpy air about 45 minutes prior to its arrival at Soekarno Hatta International Airport.

Photos show debris strewn throughout the aisles and a possible crack in the cabin ceiling.

The oxygen masks reportedly deployed mid-flight, and one passenger even said she saw another passenger hit his head on the ceiling, suffering a severe head injury.

Medical assistance teams met passengers on the tarmac. Twenty-two were treated by paramedics on site, and nine were hospitalized. According to Etihad, which says it's covering passengers' medical expenses, most will be discharged by the end of the day.

“Our pilots and cabin crew are to be commended for the calm and professional manner in which they dealt with this exceptional event, and the care they showed the passengers, despite several being injured themselves," Etihad Aiways President and CEO James Hogan said in a statement. "It is testament to the high standard of our crew training that the effects of the turbulence were minimised. At no time was the safety of the aircraft, passengers or crew compromised.”

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TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images(NAIROBI, Kenya) -- A woman has been rescued after being trapped for six days in the rubble of a collapsed building in Nairobi, Kenya, the Red Cross confirmed to ABC News.

A rescue team made contact with the woman around 11 a.m. local time Thursday, Anthony Mwangi, head of corporate affairs for the Kenya Red Cross Society, told ABC News.

"Emergency responders were able to give her oxygen and intravenously administer water and glucose to stabilize her. She was successfully evacuated around 3 p.m. local time," Mwangi said. "They did a really great job at pulling her out."

The woman's rescue was broadcast on Kenyan TV and crowds applauded as she was taken to an ambulance headed for a nearby hospital.

"She was not in a position to speak so we do not know yet who she is," Mwangi said, adding that while she had visible injuries, it was unclear how badly she had been hurt.

Rescued woman now being evacuated by our @EMS_Kenya ambulance to Kenyatta National Hospital #HurumaCollapse pic.twitter.com/maEXheppsT

— Kenya Red Cross (@KenyaRedCross) May 5, 2016

The search and rescue response is still on-going, the Red Cross said in a statement, adding that half of the rubble has been cleared.

"Working space poses the major challenge," the Kenyan Red Cross Society said, "as the collapsed building is sandwiched between buildings on two sides while the third side is a river front. There are currently two excavators at the rescue operation site which has helped to speed up the recovery efforts."

Seventy people are still missing but Mwangi said he remains hopeful that others will be found.

A 6-month-old baby, rescued on Wednesday after 80 hours in the rubble, is now in stable condition. A total of 24 bodies have so far been recovered from the debris.

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U.S. Navy photo/Released(WASHINGTON) -- New video released by The Guardian shows the intense battle between American, Kurdish and ISIS forces that killed U.S. Navy Seal Charles Keating IV.

On Tuesday, Defense Secretary Ash Carter announced that a U.S. service member had died in northern Iraq after ISIS penetrated the front lines of Kurdish Peshmerga forces.

The footage shows a convoy of U.S. vehicles under attack by ISIS fighters. Members of a SEAL quick reaction force rush in to rescue a small team of American advisers and their Kurdish allies. About a dozen U.S. special operations forces are seen in the video.

The team was assaulted by more than 100 ISIS fighters who penetrated the front lines with truck bombs and bulldozers. Keating, 31, was directly hit.

A medevac helicopter, under heavy gunfire, was able to evacuate Keating to a combat hospital in Erbil where he was pronounced dead.

The U.S. military said this fight, lasting for 14 hours and killing 60 ISIS fighters, was the largest ISIS assault in months. U.S. troops were only present for the first few hours of the battle.

Only two other Americans have suffered combat deaths in Iraq since the U.S. returned to the country in June 2014.

In late March, Marine Staff Sgt. Louis F. Cardin, 27, was killed by ISIS rocket fire on his artillery support base near Makhmour, in northern Iraq.

Last October, Army Master Sgt. Josh Wheeler, 39, was killed in a raid in northern Iraq, which rescued 70 Iraqi hostages taken by ISIS.

Speaking in Stuttgart, Germany, Carter highlighted the combat risks facing the roughly 5,000 U.S. troops in Iraq.

"It shows you it's a serious fight that we have to wage in Iraq," he said.

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