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ABCNews.com(NEW YORK) -- President Donald Trump's personal attorney Rudy Giuliani is walking back comments he has made about the timeline of the Trump Organization's "Moscow Project."

In an interview with ABC News’ Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos in December, Giuliani said Trump was having conversations with his former personal attorney Michael Cohen about the project up until and around Nov. 2016. He has repeated those claims in recent interviews.

"According to the answers that he gave, it would have covered all the way up to -- covered up to November 2016. Said he had conversations with him but the president didn't hide this," Giuliani told Stephanopoulos, indicating that this was the timeline the president provided in his written responses to special counsel Robert Mueller's questions.

Giuliani also told the New York Times on Sunday that he was basing this information on conversations he had with the president and said the discussions were ongoing throughout the entire election. Giuliani told the Times that the president told him that conversations about the project were "going on from the day I announced to the day I won."

Now, the president's personal attorney has reversed course, saying his statements were "hypothetical."

“My recent statements about discussions during the 2016 campaign between Michael Cohen and then-candidate Donald Trump about a potential Trump Moscow ‘project’ were hypothetical and not based on conversations I had with the President," Giuliani said in a statement to ABC News. "My comments did not represent the actual timing or circumstances of any such discussions. The point is that the proposal was in the earliest stage and did not advance beyond a free non-binding letter of intent.”

Trump frequently denied a connection to Russia during the election.

“I don’t know Putin, have no business whatsoever with Russia, have nothing to do with Russia,” he said at an Oct. 2016 rally.

Much remains unknown about the plans for a Trump Tower in Moscow.

Cohen worked hand-in-hand with Felix Sater, a Russian-born business associate who scouted deals for the Trump Organization, to set in motion plans for a Trump Tower in Moscow. The two even conceived an idea to offer a $50 million penthouse in the prospective building to Russian President Vladimir Putin, a source familiar with the deal told ABC News.

The public first learned in the summer of 2017 that Cohen had been pursuing a deal to build a Trump Tower in Moscow even after his boss had begun to campaign for president.

At the time, Cohen told members of Congress that the deal never progressed beyond an initial "letter of intent" and it was halted in Jan. 2016, before the Iowa caucuses.

But later, Cohen admitted in court that he made the false statements about the project “to be consistent with Individual 1’s political messaging and to be loyal to Individual 1.” Individual 1 was believed to be Trump, based on the description in court documents.

The president during the campaign denied working on any deals with Russia but tweeted late last year that he “lightly looked at doing a building in Moscow.”

Cohen was sentenced in December to three years in prison for financial crimes, lying to Congress and for two violations of campaign finance law.

He’s scheduled to report to prison in early March, but he could have a busy month of congressional testimony before then.

He has already agreed to appear publicly before the House Oversight and Reform Committee on Feb. 7, and Schiff has expressed interest in bringing Cohen back to the House Intelligence Committee for an interview behind closed doors.

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ABCNews.com(DES MOINES, Iowa) -- Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand visited coffee shops, gift stores and even a brewing company to meet with voters during a whirlwind weekend trip in a push to make headway 13 months before the Iowa caucuses in what will be a crowded Democratic field.

The residents who gathered to hear her speak, came for a variety of reasons.

Sandi O’Brien, vice chair for the Woodbury County Democrats, went to a gathering in Sioux City on Friday during her lunch break and brought a copy of the senator’s book and a permanent marker for her to sign it.

“Today I’m not so much listening for policy as I am just to get a feel for her personally to see if she’s authentic and how she would do against [President Donald] Trump,” she said.

Janet Hopkins and her 15-year-old granddaughter, Chloe, saw the senator announce her presidential bid days earlier and went to meet her at a coffee shop in Sioux City to talk about universal healthcare.

“Chloe has had six open heart surgeries, she just got back from Mayo not too long ago,” Hopkins said. “If I’m gone or her parents are gone, is Chloe going to be able to provide for herself?”

The senator sat down with the two for several minutes and told Chloe to "keep going" and that she would fight for her. They also talked about school and what subjects Chloe likes to study. The senator noted that her son, Theo, is also 15.

Even at friendly meet-and-greets organized by local Democratic organizations, the senator from New York faced tough questions about some of the decisions she has made during her time in Congress.

At a house party organized by local Democrats, a resident asked the senator to explain why she used to have an “A” rating from the NRA.

“I had only really looked at guns through the lens of hunting. My mom still shoots the Thanksgiving turkey but when I became a senator I recognized I had a lot to learn about my state and all the 20 million people I was going to represent,” Gillibrand said.

Once considered a moderate Democrat, Gillibrand first served in the House and represented a Republican-leaning district in upstate New York where she admittedly had conservative views on topics like immigration and gun rights.

“I proudly have an ‘F’ rating with the NRA," she later added.

Throughout the weekend, Gillibrand was repeatedly asked about her comments on former Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., who stepped down after multiple allegations of sexual misconduct were raised against him. She was the first senator to call on him to resign, a move that reportedly garnered some backlash from those among her ranks.

“My decision was not to remain silent and you have to stand up for what’s right, especially when it’s hard,” said Gillibrand. “If you create a pass because you love someone or you like someone, or admire someone, or they’re part of your team, it’s not okay. It’s just not.”

Not all Iowans saw her comments on Franken as contentious, in fact, it helped her clinch her first political endorsement. Kyla Paterson, the first transgender chair of the Stonewall Caucus of the Iowa Democratic Party, said she was moved to back Gillibrand because she called for Franken’s ouster.

“I would not have endorsed her if she didn’t,” said Paterson. “She stood on principle, not because it was an opportunistic thing.”

Gillibrand took the stage at the Women’s March Iowa where she spoke to a crowd of hundreds inside the state capitol as thousands more participated in marches across the country.

Cheers erupted as the presidential hopeful praised the victories that female voters have been able to achieve and she asked the crowd to picture a world with more women in power.

“Despite that progress, women still do not represent 51 percent of elected leaders in this country," she said. "Imagine just for a moment what America would look like if it did. Imagine what would be possible."

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ABCNews.com(NEW YORK) -- California Sen. Kamala Harris announced Monday on "Good Morning America" that she will be running for president in 2020, a move that could make her the first woman and woman of color to serve as U.S. president if elected.

Before Harris was elected in 2016 as the junior senator representing California, she was the state's attorney general for six years and San Francisco's district attorney for seven years. Born to an Indian mother and Jamaican father in Oakland, Harris "had a stroller-eye view of the Civil Rights movement," according to her official Senate bio.

Harris has been compared to former President Barack Obama for quickly rising through the ranks of the Democratic Party, and for having presidential ambitions after serving for just a short time in the Senate. Harris has previously said she feels the country is ready to make history by electing a woman of color as president.

"We need to give the American public more credit,” she said on 'GMA' when asked if the country was ready for a woman of color to be president. “We have so much more in common than what separates us."

Here’s what you need to know:

Name: Kamala Devi Harris

Age: 54

Birthplace: Oakland, California

Party:
Democrat

What she does now:

U.S. Senator from California. Elected in 2016, she serves on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, the Select Committee on Intelligence, the Committee on the Judiciary and the Committee on the Budget.

What she used to do:


Served as the attorney general of California from 2011 to 2017. Served as the district attorney of San Francisco from 2004 to 2010. Prior to that Harris worked for San Francisco's City Attorney, Louise Renne, as the chief of the Community and Neighborhood Division and as the deputy district attorney in Alameda County. She attended Howard University and received her law degree from the University of California, Hastings.

Career as a prosecutor:

Beginning her career as the deputy district attorney in Alameda County, Harris specialized in prosecuting child sexual assault cases. She was the first African-American woman to be elected district attorney of San Francisco and started a program that gave first-time drug offenders an opportunity to earn a high-school diploma and offered them job opportunities.

Harris was also the first woman, first African-American and first Asian-American to serve as California's attorney general, and refers to herself as a "progressive prosecutor." However, Harris has recently received criticism for some of her stances as a prosecutor. Lara Bazelon, a University of San Francisco law professor, wrote in a New York Times op-ed last week that if Harris "wants people who care about dismantling mass incarceration and correcting miscarriages of justice to vote for her, she needs to radically break with her past."

While Harris personally opposes the death penalty, she promised to defend it as California's attorney general in 2014, and appealed a federal judge’s decision that it was unconstitutional. Harris also won a $25 billion settlement for California homeowners hit by the foreclosure crisis, but refused to prosecute Steven Mnuchin's OneWest Bank for foreclosure violations in 2013.

What she did as a senator:

Elected in 2016, Harris has quickly made a name for herself. She drew attention for her focused questioning during last year's Supreme Court confirmation hearings for now-Justice Brett Kavanaugh. A member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Harris called Kavanaugh "unfit" to serve on the Supreme Court.

During an emotional exchange between Harris and Professor Christine Blasey Ford, Harris said she believed Ford and praised her courage for coming forward.

"You have passed a polygraph and submitted the results to this committee. Judge Kavanaugh has not. You have called for outside witnesses to testify and for expert witnesses to testify. Judge Kavanaugh has not. But most importantly, you have called for an independent FBI investigation into the facts. Judge Kavanaugh has not," Harris said.

A vocal critic of President Donald Trump, Harris called his border wall "a vanity project," and described the partial government shutdown -- now the longest-running in U.S. history that has left about 800,000 federal workers without pay -- "an emergency of his own creation."

Harris also recently announced the "LIFT Act," a tax proposal that aims to help U.S. families earning less than $100,000 a year to become eligible for a monthly tax credit of up to $500, or $6,000 a year.

What you might not know about her:

Harris is the daughter of an Indian mother and Jamaican father, and is the second African-American woman and first South Asian-American senator in history.

In Sanskrit, her name means "lotus."

She is the author of a newly-released memoir, "The Truths We Hold: An American Journey," and the children's book, "Superheroes Are Everywhere." Harris credits her late mother, Shyamala Gopalan Harris, with empowering her to look for solutions. "I was raised that, when you see a problem, you don't complain about it, you go and do something about it," Harris previously said in a "Good Morning America" interview.

Harris chose to announce her campaign on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, citing the civil rights leader as an inspiration that inspires her. Her campaign colors -- yellow, red and blue -- are a homage to the campaign of Shirley Chisholm, the first Black woman ever to run for president from a major party, and who launched her presidential bid 47 years ago this week, according to Harris' campaign.

In October, Harris took a two-day trip through Iowa for the first time in a decade to campaign for state-level Democratic candidates there. The last time Harris visited was in 2008 to campaign for then-Sen. Barack Obama.

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Rex_Wholster/iStock(PHOENIX) -- Four humanitarian aid volunteers have been found guilty in federal court on charges related to them leaving food and water in a protected wilderness for migrants crossing the border near Arizona.

Each of the women convicted are part of Tucson and Phoenix-based advocacy group No More Deaths, which seeks to end the deaths of undocumented immigrants crossing the desert regions near the U.S.-Mexico border, according to the group's website.

The charges stem from an incident on Aug. 14, 2017, when the helpers encountered a U.S. Fish and Wildlife officer at the Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge in southwestern Arizona after they operated a vehicle there without a permit and left behind gallon jugs of water and cans of beans, the Arizona Republic reported.

The location was near where three migrants who crossed the border weeks earlier had gotten lost, according to the Phoenix newspaper. One of the migrants was never found.

Volunteer Natalie Hoffman was charged with operating a motor vehicle in a wilderness area, the verdict states. She and volunteers Oona Holcomb, Madeline Huse and Zaachila Orozco-McCormick were also charged with entering a national wildlife refuge without a permit and abandonment of property, according to the verdict, which was filed in the U.S. District of Arizona on Friday.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Bernardo Velasco wrote in his decision that a federal law requires people who access Cabeza Prieta to obtain a permit for entry, which would require the applicant to remain on designated roads and not leave anything within the refuge.

"In short: with authorized permits, pack it in/pack it out," Velasco wrote.

Not only did the women not get a permit for access, they also left water, food and crates on the protected land, the verdict states.

"All of this, in addition to violating the law, erodes the national decision to maintain the Refuge in its pristine nature," Velasco wrote.

In addition, the preserve is "littered with unexploded military ordinance" because it is surrounded by the U.S. Department of Defense's Barry Goldwater Bombing Range, according to the verdict. The Tohono O’Odham nation and U.S. Border Patrol are also nearby, Velasco wrote.

After the trial began last week, Orozco-McCormick testified that she considered the work to be "sacred" and compared the refuge to a graveyard due to all the migrants who have died there, the Arizona Republic reported.

The women did not seek a permit because they would have been required to sign an agreement, which is required of anyone seeking a permit, according to the Republic.

When Hoffman was asked why she didn't sign the document, she replied, "I was there to leave water," the newspaper reported.

Velasco wrote in his decision that the defendants claimed they were acting in accordance with a higher law, adding that one of the defendants claimed "her conduct is not civil disobedience, but rather civil initiative, which is somehow not a criminal offense."

The women did not known their conduct could be punishable for up to six months in prison, and each acted on "the mistaken belief that the worst that could happen was that they could be banned" or fined, according to the verdict. No More Deaths did not inform them their conduct could be prosecuted as a criminal offense, Velasco wrote.

The court will decide on an "agreeable date" for sentencing next week. In addition to six months in prison, the women may also face a $500 fine each, the Tucson Sentinel reported.

After the decision was filed, protesters with No More Deaths held a "vibrant noise demonstration" outside of the Eloy Detention Center in Pinal County, Arizona, the group wrote on Instagram.

"We wanted those inside to know we see them, that we know they resist, that they are not forgotten," the group wrote. "We took this action because though our work is so often centered on the death and suffering in the desert, but we know the story doesn't end there."

Neither No More Deaths nor an attorney for the volunteers immediately returned ABC News' request for comment.

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Al Drago/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Former Vice President Joe Biden, speaking at a breakfast Monday morning in Washington honoring Martin Luther King Jr., said that white Americans need to acknowledge and admit the fact that systemic racism still exists and must be rooted out.

"The bottom line is we have a lot to root out, but most of all the systematic racism that most of us whites don't like to acknowledge even exists," Biden said at an event hosted by the Rev. Al Sharpton and the National Action Network. "We don't even consciously acknowledge it. But it's been built into every aspect of our system."

 He continued, "Because when your schools are substandard, when your houses are undervalued, when your car insurance costs more for no apparent reason, when poverty rates for black Americans is still twice that of white Americans, ... there's something we have to admit. Not you -- we -- White America has to admit there's a still a systematic racism. And it goes almost unnoticed by so many of us."

Biden also expressed optimism that positive change is on its way, referencing the historic nature of the presidential inauguration he attended 10 years ago this weekend, when Barack Obama became the nation's first African-American president.

"There I was, it just hit me, standing, waiting for a black man to come 28 miles from Philadelphia to pick me up and take me on a 128-mile ride to be sworn in as president and vice president United States. Don't tell me, don't tell me things can't change!" Biden said to applause.

The former vice president is the subject of intense speculation over whether or not he will mount a presidential campaign in 2020 to try to unseat President Donald Trump.

While he did not move closer to announcing a presidential bid Monday, another presidential contender, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, stoked further speculation about both his and Biden's presidential plans during comments at the same Washington event.

"Whatever the next year brings for Joe and me and I know we'll both keep our eyes on the real prize, and that is electing a Democrat to the White House in 2020, and getting our country back on track," Bloomberg said. "I haven't had a chance yet to talk to the Vice President at length today but I did want to get some pointers from him on how it's like to live in Washington, D.C."

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Rich Fury/Getty Images for Fashion Nova(WASHINGTON) -- Tomi Lahren insulted Cardi B's intelligence on Twitter and it went about as well as you might expect, with ripple effects prompting a subsequent feud between Lahren and a member of Congress over the weekend.

"Looks like @iamcardib is the latest genius political mind to endorse the Democrats. HA! Keep it up, guys! #MAGA2020," the outspoken conservative commentator tweeted on Wednesday.

 Lahren, who is a supporter of President Donald Trump, appeared to be referencing an expletive-laden video Cardi B shared on social media last week wherein the rapper criticizes Trump and expresses fear over the government shutdown -- which is now the longest in U.S. history.

The rapper fired back on Sunday, tweeting, "Leave me alone I will dog walk you."

This prompted debates on social media about the meaning of the term, with some pointing to an Urban Dictionary definition: "When you’re beating someone’s a-- and you’re dragging them as if you were walking a dog."

Lahren, who is a Fox Nation host, doubled down with a second tweet insulting the Grammy-winning rapper's intelligence, writing, "I’m sure you would. Still doesn’t make your political rambling any less moronic. #BuildthatWall."

Cardi quickly clapped back with an insult of her own, accusing Lahren of being a "sheep" -- someone who follows others but can't think for themselves.

"You’re so blinded with racism that you don’t even realize the decisions the president you root for is destroying the country you claim to love so much .You are a perfect example on no matter how educated or smart you think you are you still a SHEEP!" the "Bodak Yellow" rapper tweeted.

Cardi's response appeared to please another firebrand on Twitter -- Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who became the youngest woman elected to Congress in 2018.

"Why do people think they can mess with Bronx women without getting roasted? They act as though our borough hasn’t been perfecting the clapback game since the Sugarhill Gang ?? y’all just found it on Twitter," the congresswoman wrote.

Cardi B, whose full name is Belcalis Marlenis Almánzar, was born and raised in the Bronx, and Ocasio-Cortez represents the eastern part of the borough.

Lahren, who appeared to be referencing Cardi's "dog walk" comment, accused the congresswoman of applauding violence.

"Aren’t you the same girl who whines about Trump inciting violence? Now you applaud it because it’s against a female conservative you disagree with politically? Convenient. P.S. I do fully acknowledge @iamcardib is smarter than YOU," Lahren wrote.

Ocasio-Cortez's response was to Cardi's tweet referring to Lahren as a "sheep" and not to the tweet where the rapper said she would "dog walk" Lahren. ABC News has reached out to the congresswoman's office, but a request for comment was not immediately returned.

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Marilyn Nieves/iStock(WASHINGTON) -- As the nation honors civil rights icon Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Monday, a host of Democrats believed to be eyeing a presidential bid in 2020 will be delivering high-profile speeches across the country on what is shaping up to be a precursor to a long and crowded campaign to unseat President Donald Trump.

At least six major contenders for the Democratic nomination are slated to give speeches or are attending events honoring King, a major opportunity for them to speak to an issue that promises to be front and center during the 2020 campaign: race.

Amid speculation that they both might seek the Democratic nomination for president in 2020, former Vice President Joe Biden and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg offered tributes honoring King at a breakfast in Washington, D.C., hosted by civil rights leader Rev. Al Sharpton.

Biden, who has said he will announce his 2020 plans sometime in the near future, started his remarks joking he "had an announcement to make." He quickly transitioned, however, to the need to carry MLK’s legacy forward and continue to fight the "dark forces" that assassinated King and are still visible in society, referencing the racial unrest in Charlottesville in 2017.

"That was [King’s] last ... among his last words spoken, ‘to make America what it ought to be.' America's been made better by all the struggles many of you in this room have endured and led," Biden said. "But we've learned the last two years it doesn't take much to awaken hate, bring those folks out from under the rocks -- part of American society that's always been there will always be there."

Biden discussed the racism that exists in the U.S, and the need to stay vigilant against voting rights restrictions and the need for criminal justice reform, acknowledging he hasn’t always gotten it right on the latter.

"You know I've been in this fight for a long time. It goes not just to voting rights, it goes with the criminal justice system," he said. "I haven't always been right. I know we haven't always gotten things right, but I've always tried."

Biden said he is optimistic about the future of the country and the millennial generation, who he believes will lead the way. He also reflected on the historic inauguration of President Barack Obama, the nation's first black president, in which he played a central role 10 years ago this weekend.

"There I was, it just hit me, standing, waiting for a black man to come 28 miles from Philadelphia to pick me up and take me on a 128-mile mile ride to be sworn in as president and vice president of the United States," he said. "Don't tell me things can't change!"

Bloomberg, who last year registered as a Democrat and has not shot down questions about whether he will seek the White House in 2020, said whatever happens in the next year, both he and Biden are focused on defeating Trump.

"Whatever the next year brings for Joe and me ... I know we'll both keep our eyes on the real prize, and that is electing a Democrat to the White House in 2020, and getting our country back on track," Bloomberg said.

The former New York City mayor, who was a registered Independent for 11 years and a Republican prior to that, also joked that he wanted to ask Biden for tips on what life is like in the nation's capital.

"I haven't had a chance yet to talk to the vice president at length today but I did want to get some pointers from him on how it's like to live in Washington, D.C.," Bloomberg said to muted laughs. "I actually thought that was funnier than you did."

The flurry of campaign activity also comes as California Sen. Kamala Harris made her presidential bid official in an interview on ABC's "Good Morning America" with anchors Robin Roberts and George Stephanopoulos.

"I love my country. I love my country," Harris said. "This is a moment in time that I feel a sense of responsibility to stand up and fight for the best of who we are."

Harris also said she was "proud" to announce her campaign on the same day the nation honors Dr. King.

"The thing about Dr. King that always inspires me is that he was aspirational. He was aspirational like our country is aspirational," Harris said, "We know that we've not yet reached those ideals. But our strength is that we fight to reach those ideals," Harris said. "So today, the day we celebrate Dr. King, is a very special day for all of us as Americans and I'm honored to be able to make my announcement on the day we commemorate him."

President Trump also marked the holiday with a brief visit to the site memorializing Dr. King along the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C., later tweeting a video saying it was an "honor" to pay tribute to King.

 Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) both spoke at the NAACP "King Day at the Dome" event in Columbia, South Carolina, giving harsh rebukes of Trump as they honored Dr. King.

"Today we talk about justice, today we talk about racism. And I must tell you, it gives me no pleasure to tell you that we now have a president of the United States who is a racist," Sanders said on the steps of the South Carolina statehouse in Columbia.

 "We are gathered together because we believe in our democracy, and we know in this country the power of the people is always greater than the people in power," said Booker, who referenced a "spiritual dissatisfaction" with the current state of American society in his speech.

"We're dissatisfied that we live in a society that's getting seduced by celebrity and forget that significance is more important than celebrity, that purpose is more important than popularity, that we cannot be a nation that loves power more than it loves people," Booker added.

Sanders, who was Hillary Clinton's top rival for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2016, won just 26 percent of the vote in South Carolina in the 2016 Democratic primary, a harbinger of his later struggles with black voters, who propelled Clinton to victory in every single southern state.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, (D-NY) who last week announced the formation of a presidential exploratory committee and is fresh off her first campaign swing in Iowa, joined at a National Action Network event in Harlem.

 In her speech, Gillibrand struck an aspirational tone while decrying what she says are President Trump's attempts to "tear this country apart."

"Every generation has chosen to make a more perfect union, to bring more people into those rights. For a reason – because that’s who we are as Americans. Despite all our flaws. We want to bring people together, not tear them apart," Gillibrand said at an event alongside Sharpton and other elected officials in New York City.

"Until now. Until this person in this President, who has chosen to tear this country apart, against all racial lines against all religious lines. Every division, every line you can find."

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), who has also announced a presidential exploratory committee and has made campaign trips to Iowa and New Hampshire in recent weeks, spoke at a breakfast in Boston honoring King Monday morning.

Many Democrats are hoping that the types of conversations about race in speeches on Monday will extend beyond the holiday and that candidates will have honest conversations about issues facing communities of color all across America.

Both Warren and Gillibrand sought to highlight the economic plight of those communities in sleekly produced videos announcing their exploratory committees.

"It is outrageous to ask women of color to bear the burdens of every single one of these fights over and over again," Gillibrand said in a clip featured in her announcement video.

"Working families today face a lot tougher path than my family did," Warren said in her announcement video. "And families of color face a path that is steeper and rockier, and a path made even harder by generations of discrimination."

 Former San Antonio mayor and secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julián Castro made an explicit reference to the Black Lives Matter movement during his presidential announcement earlier this month.

"If police in Charleston can arrest Dylann Roof after he murdered nine people worshipping at Bible study without hurting him, then don’t tell me that Michael Brown, and Tamir Rice, and Aiyana Jones, and Eric Garner, and Jason Pero, and Stephon Clark, and Sandra Bland shouldn’t still be alive today, too," Castro said during his announcement speech in San Antonio, referring to African-Americans who were killed in encounters with police. "We’re going to keep saying their names and those of too many others just like them who were victims of state violence. We’re going to keep saying that Black Lives Matter while working toward a justice system where it’s true."

The Democratic field in 2020, which could be as large as 20 candidates, including potentially eight U.S. senators, is shaping up to be one of the most diverse in history.

Of the seven major candidates who have formally announced presidential bids or exploratory committees, one, Harris, is African-American, Castro, is Latino and another, Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, is Asian; additionally, four five of the candidates are women.

Other candidates of color who have been rumored to have 2020 aspirations include Booker, former Attorney General Eric Holder and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, among others.

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MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence made a brief visit to the Martin Luther King Jr. national monument in Washington, where they placed a wreath and then participated in a moment of silence for the civil rights leader.

The visit lasted a little more than 90 seconds and Trump briefly spoke to reporters who had gathered with them. It was windy and temperatures registered at 18 degrees.

"Good morning everybody. Great day, it's a beautiful day," Trump said. "Thank you everybody for being here. Appreciate it."

Trump faced criticism in 2018 for marking the holiday with a visit to his private golf course in Palm Beach, Florida.

Presidents in the past have typically used the national holiday to participate in community service or celebratory events honoring King's life.

Trump tweeted earlier in the day, honoring King "for standing up for the self-evident truth Americans hold so dear, that no matter what the color of our skin or the place of our birth, we are all created equal by God."

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ABC/Lorenzo Bevilaqua(NEW YORK) -- California Sen. Kamala Harris announced Monday that she will run for president in 2020, joining an increasingly crowded field of Democrats seeking to challenge President Donald Trump.

Harris' announcement, made on ABC News' Good Morning America, comes following months of speculation surrounding the Democrat, a rising star in the party who was elected California's junior senator in 2016 after two terms as the state's attorney general.

"I love my country. I love my country," she said. "This is a moment in time that I feel a sense of responsibility to stand up and fight for the best of who we are."

The bid for the presidency puts Harris in a position -- if she could emerge from the Democratic field and then beat Trump -- to become the first woman and woman of color to ascend to the nation's highest office.

Less than two weeks ago, Harris, 54, said she was not yet ready to make an announcement about a possible campaign. In the interim, at least three serious contenders declared their candidacies or interest in running, including Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, and former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., earlier announced that she was forming a presidential exploratory committee.

As part of her announcement, on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Harris cited the civil rights leader as an inspiration, saying that she seeks to continue his fight to make the country better.

"The thing about Dr. King that always inspires me is that he was aspirational. He was aspirational like our country is aspirational. We know that we've not yet reached those ideals. But our strength is that we fight to reach those ideals," the senator said. "So today, the day we celebrate Dr. King, is a very special day for all of us as Americans and I'm honored to be able to make my announcement on the day we commemorate him."

In interviews earlier this month coinciding with the release of her memoir, Harris explained that she was empowered at a young age with the disposition to take personal responsibility to address the hardships she encountered, an attribute that appears to be part of her pitch to voters.

"I was raised that, when you see a problem, you don't complain about it, you go and do something about it," she said on Good Morning America on Jan. 8.

On Monday, Harris further explained that she believed the American people were looking for a commander in chief with "leadership skills, experience and integrity," who will "fight on their behalf."

"On all of those points, I feel very confident about my ability to lead," she said. "I feel very confident about my ability to listen and to work on behalf of the American public. The American public wants a fighter, and they want someone that is going to fight like heck for them and not fight based on self-interests. I'm prepared to do that."

In a video released Monday morning as she made her announcement, Harris explains her interest in launching a campaign, detailing values such as "truth, justice, decency, equality, freedom [and] democracy," which she says are "all on the line now."

"The future of our country depends on you and millions of others lifting our voices to fight for our American values. That’s why I’m running for president of the United States," Harris says in the video, titled "Kamala Harris: For the People" -- the theme of her campaign. "I’m running to lift those voices. To bring our voices together."

The senator further invites viewers to join her in Oakland, California, on Sunday, in what Harris' staff say will be the campaign's official launch.

Though she has served only two years in the Senate, Harris has drawn attention from Democrats for her trenchant examinations on the Senate Judiciary Committee, particularly during last year's Supreme Court confirmation hearings for now-Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Following the record number of women and candidates of color elected during the 2018 midterm elections, Harris -- who was born to an Indian mother and Jamaican father -- was increasingly floated as a presidential candidate who could similarly represent the increasing diversity of the United States.

Asked earlier this month whether the country was ready for a woman of color to be president, Harris was unequivocal and expressed optimism.

"Absolutely," she said, adding, "We need to give the American public more credit ... we have so much more in common than what separates us."

Despite waiting until Monday to make her official announcement, Harris is no stranger to the early states where she will soon campaign. In 2018, the senator visited Iowa and South Carolina to stump for local candidates.

It's also likely she could spend significant time in her home state of California, which moved up its primary to Super Tuesday in March 2020 in the hopes of playing a more significant role in the nominating process.

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Ron Sachs-Pool/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) --  In a Sunday morning tweetstorm, President Donald Trump lashed out at Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and Democrats for rejecting his proposal offering temporary protections to some undocumented immigrants in exchange for $5.7 billion in border security funding.

The president accused Pelosi of behaving "irrationally” for turning down his offer.

“Nancy Pelosi has behaved so irrationally & has gone so far to the left that she has now officially become a Radical Democrat. She is so petrified of the ‘lefties’ in her party that she has lost control.”

He added in another tweet, “Nancy Pelosi and some of the Democrats turned down my offer yesterday before I even got up to speak. They don’t see crime & drugs, they only see 2020 - which they are not going to win.”

Nancy Pelosi has behaved so irrationally & has gone so far to the left that she has now officially become a Radical Democrat. She is so petrified of the “lefties” in her party that she has lost control...And by the way, clean up the streets in San Francisco, they are disgusting!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 20, 2019

Nancy Pelosi and some of the Democrats turned down my offer yesterday before I even got up to speak. They don’t see crime & drugs, they only see 2020 - which they are not going to win. Best economy! They should do the right thing for the Country & allow people to go back to work.

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 20, 2019

During an address on Saturday in the Diplomatic Room of the White House, the president presented what he called a “compromise” bill aimed at reopening the government, securing border wall funding, and providing legal protections for some undocumented immigrants. When details of the proposal leaked to the press ahead of the president’s announcement, Democrats swiftly panned the offer as dead on arrival because it did not offer permanent protections for some immigrants. Pelosi called Trump’s proposal a “non-starter.”

The president also defended his proposal from immigration hardliners on the right who claim it offers amnesty.

Trump tweeted that amnesty "is not a part" of his shutdown offer, and added that there will be "no big push" to remove undocumented immigrants. But he ended by threatening Pelosi, seeming to refer to potential deportations. “Be careful Nancy!” Trump tweeted.

No, Amnesty is not a part of my offer. It is a 3 year extension of DACA. Amnesty will be used only on a much bigger deal, whether on immigration or something else. Likewise there will be no big push to remove the 11,000,000 plus people who are here illegally-but be careful Nancy!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 20, 2019

On Saturday, right-wing writer Ann Coulter railed against the proposal.

“Trump proposes amnesty. We voted for Trump and got Jeb!” Coulter tweeted.

James Carafano from the conservative Heritage Foundation said that while the Trump administration should be "applauded for its attempts to both secure our border and end the government shutdown," he added that "including amnesty in the new proposal is not the way to do it." During a briefing with reporters yesterday afternoon following Trump's announced proposal, Vice President Mike Pence tried to push back on right-wing criticisms.

"There is no amnesty in the president's proposal, there is no pathway to citizenship in this proposal. It is 3-year relief for TPS and DACA," Pence said.

Jared Kushner, a senior adviser to Trump, said the president is “tired of posturing from both sides" and said he hopes Trump’s proposal builds “trust” for future, larger reforms as the president suggested in his tweet this morning.

"What's keeping people hopeful is if they see breakthrough here it sets a positive tone" Kushner said.

However, Democrats did not signal they would be open to any negotiations, and Pelosi said that Democrats plan to plow ahead on unrelated border security bills next week.

Meanwhile, as the longest government shutdown in U.S. history reaches the one month mark, over 800,000 federal workers remain furloughed or working without pay while Trump and Pelosi engage in a political tit-for-tat.

Pelosi requested that the president postpone the State of the Union address to Congress, citing security concerns during the partial government shutdown. The president retaliated by halting the use of a government plane for a special congressional trip to Brussels and Afghanistan Pelosi and Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., were among the members slated to attend.

The White House has not yet announced any alternative plans for the State of the Union. On Twitter, the president said he is looking at “so many options” for the address, including delivering it on Capitol Hill.

“Nancy, I am still thinking about the State of the Union speech, there are so many options — including doing it as per your written offer (made during the Shutdown, security is no problem), and my written acceptance. While a contract is a contract, I’ll get back to you soon!” the president tweeted.

Nancy, I am still thinking about the State of the Union speech, there are so many options - including doing it as per your written offer (made during the Shutdown, security is no problem), and my written acceptance. While a contract is a contract, I’ll get back to you soon!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 20, 2019

Yesterday, Trump was asked if his political feud with the Speaker of the House has become too personal.

“Whether it is personal or not, it is not personal for me. She's being controlled by the radical left which is a problem,” Trump replied.

But on Sunday morning, the president insulted Pelosi’s home district, which includes San Francisco.

“And by the way,” Trump tweeted, “clean up the streets in San Francisco, they are disgusting!”

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iStock(WASHINGTON) -- As the nation is set to honor civil rights icon Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on Monday, a host of Democrats thought to be eyeing a presidential bid in 2020 will be delivering high-profile speeches across the country on what is shaping up to be a precursor to a long and crowded campaign to unseat President Donald Trump.

At least six major contenders for the Democratic nomination will be giving speeches or attending events honoring King, a major opportunity for them to speak to an issue that promises to be front and center during the 2020 campaign: race.

Former Vice President Joe Biden, who has not publicly announced whether he will seek the White House in 2020, and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg are both set to speak at the National Action Network's annual King breakfast Monday morning in Washington, D.C., alongside the group's leader, Rev. Al Sharpton, and King's eldest son, Martin Luther King III.

Sharpton tweeted about the event Sunday morning.

New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, who last week announced the formation of a presidential exploratory committee and is fresh off of her first campaign swing through the state of Iowa, will join Sharpton later Monday at a National Action Network event in Harlem.

Sens. Bernie Sanders, I-Vermont, and Sen. Cory Booker, D-New Jersey, are both slated to speak at the NAACP "King Day at the Dome" event in Columbia, South Carolina, according to organizers of the event.

Sanders, who was Hillary Clinton's top rival for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2016, won just 26 percent of the vote in South Carolina in the 2016 Democratic primary, a harbinger of his later struggles with black voters, who propelled Clinton to victory in every single southern state.

Like Biden, Sanders has not made a decision on whether he will mount another presidential bid in 2020, but he has been hampered recently by reports of widespread sexual harassment against women who worked on his 2016 campaign.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who has also announced a presidential exploratory committee and has made campaign trips to Iowa and New Hampshire in recent weeks, is speaking at a breakfast in Boston honoring King.

Many Democrats are hoping that the types of conversations about race in speeches on Monday will extend beyond the MLK holiday and that candidates will have honest conversations about issues facing communities of color all across America.

Both Warren and Gillibrand sought to highlight the economic plight of those communities in sleekly produced videos announcing their exploratory committees.

"It is outrageous to ask women of color to bear the burdens of every single one of these fights over and over again," Gillibrand said in a clip featured in her announcement video.

"Working families today face a lot tougher path than my family did," Warren said in her announcement video. "And families of color face a path that is steeper and rockier, and a path made even harder by generations of discrimination."

Former San Antonio Mayor and Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julián Castro made an explicit reference to the Black Lives Matter movement during his presidential announcement earlier this month.

"If police in Charleston can arrest Dylann Roof after he murdered nine people worshipping at Bible study without hurting him, then don’t tell me that Michael Brown, and Tamir Rice, and Aiyana Jones, and Eric Garner, and Jason Pero, and Stephon Clark, and Sandra Bland shouldn’t still be alive today, too," Castro said during his announcement speech in San Antonio, referring to African-Americans who were killed in encounters with police. "We’re going to keep saying their names and those of too many others just like them who were victims of state violence. We’re going to keep saying that Black Lives Matter while working toward a justice system where it’s true."

The Democratic field in 2020, which could be as large as 20 candidates, including potentially eight U.S. senators, is shaping up to be one of the most diverse in U.S. history.

Of the six major candidates who have formally announced presidential bids or exploratory committees, one -- Castro -- is Latino. Another, Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, is Asian, and four of the candidates are women.

Other candidates of color who have been rumored to have 2020 aspirations include Booker, California Sen. Kamala Harris, former Attorney General Eric Holder and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti.

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Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The Democratic chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee said he “would not rule out a wall in certain instances” after President Donald Trump proposed a new immigration and border security plan Saturday in an attempt to end the partial government shutdown.

Asked if he would “rule out a wall,” Rep. Bennie Thompson of Mississippi said, “I would not rule out a wall in certain instances."

“The notion that we can't have barriers is just something that's not true," he said, adding, "You have to have a plan, and the plan that the president initially started with is not where he is now. And so we don't know where he will be tomorrow, but clearly, Democrats are for border security, but we're not for this constantly moving the ball just for a talking point.”

On Saturday, in an address from the White House, Trump proposed an immigration and border security plan in an effort to end the shutdown and “solve the crisis on the southern border.”

The plan has many components, but at the crux of it, Trump wants $5.7 billion to build an additional 230 miles of a see-through steel barrier system -- “or a wall.”

“This is not a 2,000-mile concrete structure from sea to sea. These are steel barriers in high-priority locations,” Trump said.

On This Week, Thompson told Co-anchor Martha Raddatz, “I don’t think Democrats are opposed to any physical barriers. It's just the president constantly evolves his description of the wall, just as he indicated Mexico was going to pay for whatever was there.”

In an effort to entice Democrats to support the deal, he also proposed extending protections from deportation for three years for 700,000 so-called “Dreamers,” children brought to the U.S. illegally by their parents who were given a protected status under former President Barack Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) executive order, and for Temporary Protected Status recipients whose status is currently facing expiration.

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Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call(WASHINGTON) -- As the partial government shutdown reaches Day 30, Sen. James Lankford, R-Oklahoma, said Sunday on This Week that President Donald Trump's latest proposal to end the partial government shutdown is a "reasonable compromise" that should be taken up by Congress.

"What I encouraged the White House to do, and multiple others encouraged the White House to do, is put out a proposal," Lankford said. "The vote this week is not to pass the bill. It's to open up and say, 'Can we debate this?' 'Can we amend it?' 'Can we make changes?'"

On Saturday, Trump announced his new proposal to end the government shutdown in a speech from the White House.

The president's plan still includes $5.7 billion for a "physical barrier" along the Southern border. Additionally, Trump said his plan includes "$800 million in urgent humanitarian aid, $805 million for drug-detection technology to help secure our ports of entry, an additional 2,750 border agents and law enforcement professionals" and "75 new immigration judge teams."

Trump said in his speech that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, would bring the proposal to a vote on the Senate floor this week. McConnell said in a statement that the president's offer "strikes a fair compromise" to reopen the government.

But Democrats were quick to reject the president’s proposal.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a statement before the speech that the president's plan to offer temporary extensions for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and Temporary Protected Status recipients is a "non-starter," and called on the president to reopen the government so negotiations can continue.

After the speech, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-New York, said, "It was the president who single-handedly took away DACA and TPS protections in the first place. Offering some protections back in exchange for the wall is not a compromise but more hostage-taking."

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ABC News(TIJUANA, Mexico) -- Alisson Luna, 22, fled Honduras after she was raped, with her three children and grandmother, embarking on a nearly 3,000-mile journey to reach the United States in order to seek asylum. Waiting in Tijuana, Mexico until she and her family could make their claim, Luna told ABC News that this was the only option for her.

Luna and her family are waiting at El Barretal, a music venue-turned-migrant shelter about 30 miles south of the U.S. southern border. Raddatz and her team were given masks when they were there, to protect against disease in the cramped and crowded shelter that had only 300 migrants when ABC News was there Wednesday, but which, at its peak, was the waiting place for 3,000.

Raddatz asked Luna if a border wall would stop people attempting to cross illegally.

“No,” she said.

A wall along the U.S.-Mexico border was a signature campaign promise for President Donald Trump, and the government has been partially shut down for a record 30 days because Trump and Congress can’t agree on a funding deal.

On Saturday, Trump announced a new immigration and border security plan as an attempt to reach an agreement between Republicans and Democrats to end the shutdown. In addition to many funding propositions related to enhanced border security, at the crux of this proposal, Trump wants $5.7 billion to build an additional 230 miles of a see-through steel barrier system, or "a wall,” as Trump said Saturday.

“This is not a 2,000-mile concrete structure from sea to sea," Trump said from the White House. "These are steel barriers in high-priority locations.”

In an attempt to entice Democrats to support the deal, he also proposed extending protections from deportation for three years for 700,000 so-called “Dreamers,” children brought to the U.S. illegally by their parents who were given a protected status under former President Barack Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) executive order, and for Temporary Protected Status recipients whose status is currently facing expiration.

Apprehensions at the border have been declining for nearly two decades, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). For the last year, those numbers have been rising, but that rise is not necessarily a trend.

After traveling back to the U.S. side of the border, Raddatz and her team toured 14 miles of the border with CBP San Diego Sector Border Patrol Chief Patrol Agent Rodney Scott. It didn’t take long for them to witness migrants, including a 25-year-old woman fleeing El Salvador with her 2-year-old son, trying to sneak into California in an area where new walls were being built. The woman and her son were apprehended by CBP.

“Is there any part of you still where you look at that family and think, 'I got to help?'” Raddatz asked Scott.

“On many, many levels, I feel compassion for those people,” Scott answered. “But I also feel compassion for the several thousand people that have been in line at the San Ysidro [San Diego] port of entry for several weeks, waiting to do it right, and those people literally just cut in line in front of them.”

Scott said CBP needs the wall, even if it’s not a complete solution.

“We cannot effectively control the border without barriers to slow down illegal entries,” he told Raddatz, adding that while a wall wouldn’t necessarily stop the illegal flow of drugs, which mainly come through legal port of entries and tunnels, a wall would allow Scott “to free up personnel to focus on that threat.”

In addition to border wall funding and temporary protections for some immigrants, Trump’s border security proposal seeks nearly $800 million for additional border agents, law enforcement officers and other staff; $800 million in humanitarian assistance, including new temporary housing for migrants; and more than $800 million for “technology, canines and personnel to help stop the flow of illegal drugs, weapons and other contraband.”

Just on Thursday morning, CBP had already arrested almost 100 people, including children. There has been a dramatic increase in the number of families crossing the border, and after backlash over a Trump administration “zero tolerance” policy that led to children being separated from adults once apprehended, families are now held together. But there’s a limit to how long children can be detained.

“If you come with a child, you will be released within about 20 days,” Scott said. “So that's created a pull factor, and once people figured that out, they don't mind being arrested, incarcerated for a few days, because they know they're going to be released into the U.S.”

Many asylum seekers are tracked with an ankle bracelet, including some migrants Raddatz spoke to at the Safe Harbors Network in San Diego, a shelter that has helped more than 7,000 refugees, immigrants and asylum seekers over the past two and a half years.

An 18-year-old mother at the shelter, who asked to not be shown on camera, was fleeing gang violence. She said she had climbed a fence to enter the United States, and that a wall wouldn’t have stopped her.

Pastor Bill Jenkins, executive director of Safe Harbors Network, said he hasn’t met any family that’s entered the country “for any other reason than the fact that if they stayed where they were, they would've been killed, they would've been raped, they would've been exploited.”

“I don't care how high you build your damn wall,” the pastor said. “Immigration is going to continue.”

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, the latest Democrat eyeing a 2020 bid for the White House, said Democrats would be “willing to talk about” a pathway to citizenship for the so-called “Dreamers,” which is further than what’s offered in President Donald Trump’s latest immigration and border security proposal to end the longest government shutdown in U.S. history.

On Sunday, Trump tweeted about his proposal, saying that “amnesty is not part of” the offer.

“Does that sound to you like he's moving a bit, and what's your reaction to that?” asked This Week Co-anchor Martha Raddatz.

“It doesn't sound like he's moving at all,” Gillibrand said. “If he really wants to work on comprehensive immigration reform, open the government and then sit down with Democratic leaders to actually work on the stuff that needs to get done. People need a pathway to citizenship, and we have 3 million Dreamers in this country and we should be protecting these young people. They came here through no fault of their own, and they've made lives.

“Why wouldn't you welcome them here to make sure they can have a pathway to citizenship? That's something we're willing to talk about, but for President Trump to hold hostage public servants, it's wrong. It's morally wrong.”

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