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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Americans will spend more than $60 billion this year on cosmetics, but have you ever thought about all the chemicals that may be in your favorite products?

You may think the United States government reviews the safety of all the lotions, creams, sprays and makeup you use, but that is not the case. Now lawmakers are raising concerns and asking questions about possible risks, and calling for the FDA to step in.

The last legislation passed to regulate safety of cosmetics was passed nearly 80-years-ago, and now the cosmetics industry could face increased scrutiny by the U.S. government, as a new bill that would give the FDA more teeth is gaining traction in Congress.

“I don’t really think about the products I use in my bathroom,” Ally Cao, 18, of Berkeley, California, told ABC News, adding, however, she does “have some worries.”

Only 11 chemicals have ever been regulated by the FDA for use in cosmetics. And no safety tests are required before beauty products hit store shelves.

Now lawmakers and celebrities are hoping to change that with legislation that would require the FDA to evaluate the safety of at least five chemicals a year and give the FDA the power to recall dangerous products.

Senators Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and Susan Collins, R-Maine, introduced the bipartisan legislation titled "Personal Care Products Safety Act," to protect consumers and streamline industry compliance, they said in a statement about the bill.

“From shampoo to lotion, the use of personal care products is widespread, however, there are very few protections in place to ensure their safety,” said Senator Feinstein. “Europe has a robust system, which includes consumer protections like product registration and ingredient reviews. I am pleased to be introducing this bipartisan legislation with Senator Collins that will require FDA to review chemicals used in these products and provide clear guidance on their safety.”

It also has the endorsement of nearly two dozen beauty brands and stars like Gwyneth Paltrow, who said in an email rallying support, “Consumers deserve to know the products they use every day are safe.”

ABC News wanted to see if our bodies are actually absorbing the chemicals that we’re putting on each day. We looked at two common chemicals: parabens, which can act as preservatives, and phthalates, controversial chemicals often used to make fragrances last longer. The CDC says the health effects of low-level exposure to these chemicals are “unknown.”

"Human health effects from environmental exposure to low levels of parabens are unknown," according to the CDC website.

After getting a baseline measurement of the chemicals in ABC News' correspondent Mary Bruce's system, for three days, she used only beauty products containing the two chemicals, parabens and phthalates. Then, for five days, she cut them out completely, using only products excluding those chemicals for her daily routine.

ABC News took urine samples at each stage of the experiment and sent them to the California Department of Health for review, then met with University of California-Berkeley researcher Kim Harley for the results.

When Bruce switched to using only products with the chemicals, the level of parabens in her system went off the charts, going up to 386 ug/g, from her baseline of 38 ug/g. The average American woman, according to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey has 23 ug/g.

When she changed to the low-chemical products, the “levels basically plummeted,” said Harley. “You went down to 6 [ug/g].”

The same thing happened with phthalates, going from her baseline of 87 ug/g, up to 284 ug/g, and back down to 45 ug/g. The average for women is 43 ug/g.

The Personal Care Products Council told ABC News families "can feel confident they are protected" and that manufacturers use "the best science and latest available research" to ensure safety before products hit store shelves.

“Families who use cosmetics and personal care products can feel confident that they are protected by a combination of federal safety regulations by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and a strong commitment by manufacturers to utilize the best science and latest available research data to substantiate the safety of a cosmetic product before it is marketed," Beth Jonas, Ph.D., the Chief Scientist for the Personal Care Products Council told ABC News in a statement. "This commitment to safety is the industry’s cornerstone with companies employing thousands of scientific and medical experts who are devoted to studying the safety of human health in relation to products and the ingredients used in them."

The FDA recently came out in support of independent review and stronger safety rules in a letter to Senator Feinstein, saying, the "FDA has much less legal authority to protect consumers from unsafe cosmetics than it does for other products the Agency regulates."

If you’re concerned about the chemicals that may be in your system from all these products, the good news, as our own tests showed, is that a few small changes can have a big impact in a short amount of time.

Harley visited with Cao to check the chemicals in the products she’s using every day.

“One thing I would tell you to look for first is fragrance,” said Harley. “Look for products that have shorter ingredients lists and fewer chemicals, that have names you can actually pronounce. That would be a good start.”


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Jaunita Rodenhiser(NEW YORK) --  A mother in Canada is asking for Christmas cards to lift the spirits of her 9-year-old daughter with cancer, who relied on the comfort of get-well cards to cheer her up while receiving treatment in the hospital.

Hailey Rodenhiser spent Christmas 2014 in the hospital after she was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia earlier that month, her mother, Jaunita Rodenhiser, told ABC News. While doctors estimated that she would be in remission within a month of treatment, it actually took six months, and Hailey continues to receive chemotherapy to this day.

At times, the maintenance treatment can be brutal, Rodenhiser said. Over the last couple of months, Rodenhiser said she noticed her daughter seemed depressed due to her health complications. Rodenhiser said she wanted to try and "change the tone" of the holiday season for Hailey and "get her energized about the holidays."

At first, Rodenhiser considered counseling to help her daughter feel better, but knowing how much her daughter loves getting mail, she decided to try a simpler alternative first, turning to Facebook for help, she said.

"This year I would like to show Hailey how much she is loved and cared about..." Rodenhiser wrote on Facebook. "Knowing how much Hailey loves getting mail, cards, and letters, one way that I know of to show her the spirit of Christmas is to request everyone [to] send her a Christmas card and/or letter of inspiration."

 Recieving the cards is the highlight of Hailey's day, Rodenhiser said. The first thing she says when they pull into the driveway after school is, "Mail!" according to her mother.

"She absolutely goes over the moon when she gets a letter or a card," Rodenhiser said, adding that Hailey is in the "best spirits" she's seen her in recentlu.

 So far, Hailey has received dozens of cards, and Rodenhiser has noticed she's beginning to get her smile back. She's happier and is actually looking forward to the holidays, Rodenhiser said. The mail makes her realize she's cared for and gets her out of funky moods when she's wondering why she can't "be like everyone else," Rodenhiser said.

Hailey's favorite type of cards to receive are ones that feature animals, especially dogs, cats and horses, Rodenhiser said. Hailey's dream is to become a veterinarian one day, and she's "always" watching funny cat videos.

Rodenhiser said that although she belives the art of writing letters and sending cards has been "lost with technology," she's happy use to social media to her advantage if it'll mean increasing the joy Hailey will receive every day this holiday season.

If you would like to send a Christmas card, send it to this address:

Hailey Rodenhiser
151 Hirtle Road
Dayspring, Nova Scotia
B4V 5R1

Keep in mind that postage to Canada from the U.S. is $1.15 for a letter weighing less than 2 ounces.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Twin girls born conjoined at the chest and abdomen were successfully separated after an 18-hour surgery that involved 50 physicians and other medical staff.

Erika and Eva Sandoval of Antelope, California, were born joined at the lower chest and upper abdomen, referred to as omphalo-ischiopagus twins. While they were born with their heart and lungs separate, they shared some lower some anatomical structures including a liver, bladder and two kidneys.

"The twins did very well," Dr. Gary Hartman, lead surgeon and Division Chief of Pediatric Surgery at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford said in statement today. "I’m very pleased; this is as good as we could have asked for."

Eva was in the operating room for 17 hours, while her sister Erika was there for an additional hour. The twin girls are now recovering in the intensive-care unit.

Prior to the surgery, the hospital estimated there was a 70 percent chance that both girls would survive the arduous procedure.

To take on the difficult surgery, the medical team created a 3D model of the girls' shared abdomen to help guide them through the surgery. They also had their their MRI and CT scans available.

Conjoined twins are exceedingly rare and occur between every 1 in 30,000 to 1 in 200,000 live births, according to Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  Four more infants have been born with birth defects related to the Zika virus in New York City, the city's Health Department announced Wednesday.

The four cases occurred after a previous reported case in July, where an infant was born with Zika-related microcephaly, characterized by an abnormally small head or brain, often leading to significant developmental problems.

These four infants were born with "congenital Zika virus syndrome," which encompasses variety of birth defects, including microcephaly, brain and eye abnormalities, shortened or hardened muscles and tendons and neurologic impairment, according to the health department.

In addition to these five cases where infants were born with health problems related to the Zika virus, eight other infants tested positive for the virus but have shown no symptoms of impairment or birth defects related to the virus, the health department said. Health officials said they will continue to monitor the children for at least a year to see if and how their symptoms progress as they get older.

In total, more than 200 infants have been born to women with a Zika virus infection in New York City, according to the health department.

“Today’s news is a reminder that Zika continues to be a threat to pregnant women and their babies," New York City Health Commissioner Dr. Mary T. Bassett said in a statement Wednesday.

"As we enter the holiday season, we urge all pregnant women in New York City, those who might become pregnant, and their male sexual partners not to visit places where there is active Zika virus transmission,” Bassett added. “We are closely following all babies born to mothers who test positive for Zika infection and will connect parents to available services to improve their child’s quality of life.”

As of Dec. 2, at least 8,000 people in New York City have been tested for the Zika virus with 962 people testing positive, according to the health department, which also noted that of those who tested positive, 325 were pregnant women. All of the Zika infections reported in New York City were acquired while traveling to areas where the virus was more prevalent, except in six cases that were spread through sexual contact, the agency said.

A Zika infection in adults often includes mild symptoms, including fever, rash, joint pain and conjunctivitis, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Approximately 1 in 5 people infected with the virus shows symptoms. Severe complications from Zika that require hospitalization are rare, and most people are over the worst of the symptoms after a week, according to the CDC.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Temperatures are expected to plummet this week in multiple states across the country, with heavy snow storms expected to hit many areas, including the plains and Great Lakes regions.

In North Dakota, a blizzard has already blanketed much of the state in multiple inches of snow. Winter weather that can leave cars stranded and driveways blocked with snow isn't just a nuisance but also a potential danger to those spending a lot of time outdoors.

Here are a few health tips to keep in mind this winter season:

Frostbite Can Appear Within Minutes

Cold temperatures and icy wind means an increased risk of frostbite. Dr. Edmundo Mandac, director of emergency medicine clinical operations at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Ohio, said in an earlier interview that it might "take only a minute or two" for people to develop frostbite symptoms in below-freezing temperatures.

"If you’re outside and you start feeling your fingers get a little bit tingly or painful, you shouldn’t ignore those signs," Mandac said. "Go in an rewarm yourself."

Even after you've warmed up after a hot cup of tea, Mandac said it still may not be safe to go outside since tissue is "more susceptible" to frostbite on a second trip outdoors.

Shoveling Snow Can Be Hard on Your Heart

Shoveling snow is often a necessary chore during a blizzard, but this is one chore you might want to avoid until the weather warms up a bit. The American Heart Association explains that cold weather and the strain of shoveling snow has been associated with an increased risk of heart attacks.

Cold temperatures put extra strain on the body, which can be a recipe for disaster, Mandac noted.

"You’re trying to warm up -- trying to shiver -- and throw in physical activity and most people are not in good physical shape," he told ABC News.

Anyone who doesn't feel up to shoveling snow physically should not try to push themselves, Mandac said.

"If you’re not sure about your health ... don’t try to shovel snow," he said.

Avoid Alcohol

Anyone who thinks that a quick sip of alcohol will take away the chill should think again. The American Heart Association says having a sip of whisky or other liquor before going to shovel snow could be more dangerous since the alcohol can cause a person "to underestimate the extra strain their body is under in the cold."

Alcohol, along with some other medications, affect how the body regulates temperature, Mandac pointed out. As a result, it might make a person more susceptible to the cold weather.

Be Aware of Hypothermia Risk and Check on Elderly Family Members

Mandac said he has seen people arrive in his emergency room suffering from severe hypothermia, with body temperatures below 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

"We really start seeing problems," with hypothermic patients, Mandac said. "They’re not thinking right. They might be in a coma. It really involves a lot of rewarming process to save them."

While some patients may have been stranded in the outdoors, others patients have become hypothermic even while in their homes, he said.

"Older people, who either because it's not warm enough for them at home or they have medications they take and can’t tell what the temperature is, they can become hypothermic even inside the house," Mandac said.

As people age, it's harder for their bodies to regulate temperature, he noted. If the power goes out or the heat doesn't come on, it can have dangerous consequences for elderly people.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also gives advice on how to heat the home safely. The CDC advice includes keeping space heaters at least three feet from anything that can catch fire, not using an extension cord for a space heater and keeping a carbon monoxide detector around.

The CDC also advises against using generators, grills or camp stoves as a heat source because they can generate deadly carbon monoxide gas.

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Courtesy San Francisco International Airport(SAN FRANCISCO) -- This little piggy is the first known airport therapy pig in the U.S., according to the San Francisco International Airport. Her name is LiLou.

She "promises to surprise and delight guests with her winning personality, charming costumes and painted nails," the airport said in a statement.

And she's no stick in the mud, either. "LiLou loves performing tricks for her audience," the airport added.

The Juliana-breed pig was officially welcomed into the airport's team of trained animals called The Wag Brigade this past Monday.

The Wag Brigade is a team of trained animals certified by the San Francisco SPCA’s Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) program to "make passenger travel more enjoyable," the airport said.

The airport said the brigade's animals are carefully selected "for their temperament and airport suitability" and that the animals "wear vests that read 'Pet Me!' to encourage interaction with airport guests."

"We have more than 300 dog, cat and rabbit volunteer teams, but LiLou is the first pig in our program," Dr. Jennifer Henley, SF SPCA Animal Assisted Therapy manager, said in the statement.

"With the addition of LiLou, we can look forward to more moments of surprise and delight for guests at our airport," added Christopher Birch, director of guest experience at the airport.

The therapy pig "also visits several other facilities in San Francisco including senior centers and hospitals," the airport noted.

LiLou's "mom" chronicles her adventures on Instagram on the account @lilou_sfpig.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) — Athletes are teaming up with veterans to fight the effects of concussions and PTSD, and they’re already seeing major results.

After four years of study, athletes and vets in treatment together at the Eisenhower Center in Michigan saw improvements in depression, anxiety, PTSD and even pain.

Now, for the first time, the After the Impact Fund will help these groups get treatment in their own, dedicated facility in Jacksonville, Florida, opening early next year.

Watch the video below for more:


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DigitalVision/ThinkstockBy DR. JENNIFER ASHTON, ABC News Senior Medical Contributor

About 1 in 10 babies are born preterm, or before completing the normal 37 to 40 weeks of pregnancy. These babies miss out on the important growth and development that happens in these final weeks.

Babies who survive can have short-term and long-term health issues, such as vision problems and intellectual impairment, so here are some things you can do:

  • Make sure you keep all your prenatal appointments. This gives your provider a chance to screen for infection or preterm contractions.
  • Commit to be fit before and during your pregnancy. Exercise is good for mom and baby and is recommended for all average risk pregnancies.
  • Listen to your body. If you’re pregnant and have any cramps, bleeding or leaking fluid, call your obstetrician or midwife immediately.

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Jim Spellman/WireImage via Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Amy Schumer has addressed "trolls" who have criticized her looks.

In an Instagram post Tuesday, the comedian stated that she is "very, very honored" to be under consideration to play "an important and evolving icon."

According to a Deadline report from Dec. 2, the actress is in negotiations to star in a live-action "Barbie" film.

Almost immediately, Schumer's critics voiced their opinions that the "Trainwreck" star does not look the part.

She responded to those critics in her Instagram post.

"Is it fat shaming if you know you're not fat and have zero shame in your game? I don't think so. I am strong and proud of how I live my life and say what I mean and fight for what I believe in and I have a blast doing it with the people I love. Where's the shame? It's not there. It's an illusion," she wrote.

"Thanks to everyone for the kind words and support and again my deepest sympathy goes out to the trolls who are in more pain than we will ever understand," she continued. "I want to thank them for making it so evident that I am a great choice. It's that kind of response that let's you know something's wrong with our culture and we all need to work together to change it."

This is not the first time Schumer, 35, has spoken out about her body. Back in April, she questioned Glamour magazine's decision to include her name on the cover of its "Chic at Any Size Issue" alongside Adele and Melissa McCarthy, and, last year, she posed semi-nude for the Pirelli calendar.

"I felt I looked more beautiful than I've ever felt in my life," she said at the time, "and I felt like it looked like me."

In her Instagram post, Schumer also noted how flattered she was by the two Grammy nominations she received Tuesday morning. The comedian's book, "The Girl With the Lower Back Tattoo," was nominated for best spoken word album and best comedy album.

"When I look in the mirror I know who I am. I'm a great friend, sister, daughter and girlfriend. I'm a bad-ass comic headlining arenas all over the world and making TV and movies and writing books where I lay it all out there and I'm fearless like you can be," she told her 5.4 million Instagram followers.

"Anyone who has ever been bullied or felt bad about yourself I am out there fighting for you, for us. And I want you to fight for yourself too! We need to laugh at the haters and sympathize with them. They can scream as loud as they want. We can't hear them because we are getting s*** done. I am proud to lead by example."

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Stanford Children's Health(PALO ALTO, Calif.) -- A pair of twin girls conjoined at the chest and abdomen will undergo a lengthy surgery to finally be separated.

Erika and Eva Sandoval, of Antelope, California, were born joined at the lower chest and upper abdomen, a type of conjoined twin called omphalo-ischiopagus twins. While their heart and lungs are separate they share some lower some anatomical structures including a liver, bladder and two kidneys.

In an effort to allow the 2-year-old girls to live independently of one another, surgeons and other physicians are performing surgery to be separate the toddlers Tuesday. The medical staff who will work on the surgery at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford, which is part of Stanford University, anticipate that there is a 70 percent chance that both girls survive the arduous operation.

"It's hard to see the numbers and find comfort on the odds. But as you know from the beginning our girls have superseded the doctors expectations of life and will continue to show us their strength," parents Aida and Arturo wrote online earlier this year.

The procedures are expected to take around 18 hours with 50 medical staff attending to the girls, according to Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford.

"This surgery is complex in terms of enabling a good quality of life for the girls after the separation," lead surgeon Dr. Gary Hartman, division chief of pediatric surgery at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, said in a statement last week.

Conjoined twins are exceedingly rare and occur between every 1 in 30,000 to 1 in 200,000 live births, according to the hospital. To take on the difficult surgery to separate Erika and Eva, the medical team created a 3D model of the girls' shared abdomen. As the surgery progresses, their MRI, CT scans and the 3D model will be used to help guide the surgeons.

"You can think of their anatomy as two people above the rib cage, merging almost into one below the bellybutton," Dr. Peter Lorenz, a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at Stanford University Medical Center who will lead the reconstructive phase of the twins’ procedure, said in a statement.

The operation is scheduled to start Tuesday, but hospital officials declined to give an update on the girls at this time due to the "complex and sensitive nature" of the operation.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- When it's time for your baby to attend school, you can bet there's going to be a little Sophia or Jackson in the classroom.

There may even be a few Aidens, Emmas, Lucases and Olivias.

That's because these names top the list of most popular baby names of 2016, according to the popular website Baby Center. The list was culled from the 400,000 submissions received from new parents.

Here are the top 10 names by gender:

GIRLS

  • Sophia
  • Emma
  • Olivia
  • Ava
  • Mia
  • Isabella
  • Riley
  • Aria
  • Zoe
  • Charlotte

BOYS

  • Jackson
  • Aiden
  • Lucas
  • Liam
  • Noah
  • Ethan
  • Mason
  • Caden
  • Oliver
  • Elijah

For the complete list of the top 50 boys' and girls' names, visit Baby Center.

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iStock/ThinkstockBy DR. JENNIFER ASHTON, ABC News Senior Medical Contributor

Are you more of a morning person or do you tend to be more productive at night? According to a new study, whether or not you’re an early bird or a night owl is actually in your DNA.

Researchers found 15 different spots in the genetic script that was likely between morning people and self-described evening people. Seven of these genetic swaps occur near genes involving regulating a person’s daily cycles or circadian rhythm.

Here's my take:

  • Try to really pay attention to your body and figure out if you’re a morning person or an evening person.
  • Don’t fight mother nature. Although I’ve had to work many all-nighters as an OB/GYN, most of my life as a doctor and a mom involves waking up way before 6 am. But try to make me stay up late? That’s a different story.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Some headphones marketed for children may not restrict enough noise for young ears, according to a new report published Tuesday by the technology guide The Wirecutter.

The Wirecutter tried out 30 different children’s headphones for style, fit and safety by using both a plastic model ear and a few real children.

“There's no governing board that oversees this,” Lauren Dragon, the Headphone Editor at The Wirecutter, told Good Morning America in an interview that aired Tuesday. Dragon added that the headphones for children all claim to limit volume to around 85 decibels. Sound below the 85 decibel mark for a maximum of eight hours is considered safe, according to the World Health Organization.

The Wirecutter report found that some of these headphones emit sound higher than the 85 decibel mark. To read the full report click here.

The report gave the highest rating for kids' headphones to the Puro BT2200, Bluetooth wireless headphones that retail for around $100 on Amazon.com. The Wirecutter notes the Puro headphones met their "volume-limiting test standards" and were liked by kid testers of all ages.

The lowest rating among the products reviewed by The Wirecutter went to a pair of wired headphones by Kidz Gear.

Dragon claimed that the volume limiter on the Kidz Gear headphones could be easily removed by children. The Wirecutter report claims that the audio level is safe with the limiter, but without it, the audio can reach as loud as 110 decibels.

The Wirecutter report notes it is up to adults to monitor children's overall noise exposure. "A limiting circuit alone doesn’t make for safe listening," the report states.

Kidz Gear told ABC News in a statement that in over 15 years they have “never had a customer complaint on using a limiter when needed.”

"Parents and children alike love the fact that the headphones can be happily used in any sound environment," the statement read. "We believe when a volume limiter is used, safe sound is achieved and any issues with volume is a user or configuration issue."

The Wirecutter report comes at a time that one in five teens now suffer from some sort of hearing loss, according to the Journal of American Medical Association. Some doctors say that headphones are to blame for this.

“I’ve seen kids as young as seven who’ve had noise-induced hearing loss,” Dr. Scott Rickert, an otolaryngologist at NYU Langone Medical Center, told ABC News. “They’re listening to their headphones at full blast.”

"We’re really talking about listening to a rock concert on a daily basis,” Rickert added.


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ABC News(NEW YORK) — Naomi Judd is part of country music royalty who, with her daughter Wynonna Judd, skyrocketed to the top of country music fame as The Judds.

Naomi Judd, 70, is now revealing that out of the spotlight she battled a “completely debilitating and life-threatening” depression that led to several stints in psychiatric wards.

“They think, because they see me in rhinestones, you know, with glitter in my hair, that really is who I am,” Naomi Judd told ABC News’ Robin Roberts, speaking of her fans. “I'm sort of a fantasy 'cause I want to provide that for them.

"But then I would come home and not leave the house for three weeks and not get outta my pajamas, not practice normal hygiene,” she added. “It was really bad.”

Naomi Judd, who is also mother to actress Ashley Judd, details her battle with depression in her new book, River of Time: My Descent into Depression and How I Emerged with Hope. The book represents a comeback for Judd, not with music but with a powerful message.

“Because what I've been through is extreme,” Naomi Judd said when asked why she is going public with her depression. “Because it was so deep and so completely debilitating and life-threatening and because I have processed and worked so hard for these last four years.”

Naomi Judd said she thought in her dark moments, “If I live through this, I want someone to be able to see that they can survive.”

Naomi Judd retired from her country music career as The Judds in 1991 after revealing she was diagnosed with hepatitis C. She declared herself “cured” of the disease in 1998 and resumed some performances with her daughter Wynonna Judd in the years after.

'Radical Acceptance'


The “Girls Night Out” singer said a part of her treatment for depression was to confront a difficult past that she said includes being molested by a member of her family at the age of 3 1/2 years old.

“I think that's one of the reasons I wanted to write the book, because my whole life I've been a people-pleaser,” she said. “And one of the reasons I got in trouble was because I never acknowledged all the bad stuff that people did to me … all the horrific experiences that I've had.”

Naomi Judd said her immediate family members had mental health issues of their own so she was left to rely on and trust only herself at a young age.

“I had to realize that in a way I had to parent myself,” Naomi Judd said. “We all have this inner child, and I needed, for the first time in my life, to look at all these times where nobody was there for me and realize that I got a raw deal.

“I just stayed in therapy and I did, like every day, and I call it radical acceptance,” she said. “Every day I exercised, which I hated at first. Hated.”

'A Little Estranged' from Wynonna Judd


Naomi Judd said she would walk to her daughter Ashley Judd’s house one mile away and, if she was home, her 48-year-old daughter would come out to give her a comforting hug.

“Ashley and I are so stinkin' much alike and people will talk about that,” she said. “I mean we have the same mannerisms. We both read a whole lot. We both love new places. She does acro-yoga. I do Pilates. I mean there's such similarities.”

Naomi Judd admits her relationship with Wynonna Judd, 52, is trickier.

“From the day I knew she existed, it was the two of us against the world and then through the decades we kind of grew up together, 'cause it was really just the two of us,” Naomi Judd said. “And I'm always tellin' her, ‘If I'd known better, I would have done better.’

“So Wy bore the brunt of all of the mistakes I made and we talk about 'em,” Judd said. “We've been through a lot of therapy together.”

The mother-daughter act reunited last year for the “Girls Night Out” residency at the Venetian in Las Vegas. Naomi Judd says the pair are now “a little estranged from each other.”

“If she sees this, and I hope she does, 'cause the smartest thing is for all of us to feel known, no matter what's goin' on. Be truthful,” Naomi Judd said. “I think she'll say, ‘Good for you, Mom, for finally being willing to talk about the bad stuff.’"

'I Have Told My Story'


Naomi Judd said what she describes as the swollen appearance in her face is a result of steroids and medication to treat her depression.

“I really haven't been eating ice cream and candy,” she said with a laugh. “I really haven't. Well, maybe a little bit, but, no.”

Naomi Judd said her treatment has gotten her to a place where she now finds joy in her everyday life.

“I laugh a lot,” she said. “I'm content and at peace because I practice radical acceptance every single day.”

By her side through it all has been her husband of 37 years, Larry Strickland, who has a message for the loved ones of people with depression.

“Get ready to walk that path with them, because they're gonna need, they're gonna need you every minute,” he said.

Naomi Judd has her own message for those walking the path of depression.

“I have told my story. Now you know and you can tell yours,” she said. “You're not alone. I am still here."

You can visit the National Institute of Mental Health’s website to find general information about mental health and depression and a locator for treatment services in your area.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- With growing concerns about the long-term effects of concussions due to football, the medical community, especially pediatricians, are grappling with how to turn early scientific studies into real-world advice for parents, coaches and school boards.

In a commentary for the medical journal Pediatrics, physicians from multiple institutions, including the University of North Carolina and Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, debate the merits and drawbacks of advising a ban of high school football.

The commentary focused on exploring the risks of high school football by having three experts give an answer to a hypothetical scenario where a small-town pediatrician has to decide whether to advise cancelling a football program.

Concussions and their possible role in the development of CTE, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy, has put a spotlight on the dangers of tackle football. In recent years, posthumous examinations of multiple professional football players have revealed the athletes had been suffering from the condition. Currently, CTE can only be diagnosed posthumously. However, the life-time risks for an average football player, especially one in high school, remain unclear.

CTE is a degenerative disease that involves a buildup of the abnormal protein called tao, which is also found in dementia patients and is associated with a breakdown of brain tissue. It's believed to be caused by repetitive trauma to the brain, especially concussions, according to the CTE Center at Boston University, and symptoms include memory loss, confusion, impulse control problems, aggression, depression, anxiety and progressive dementia.

Dr. Andrew Gregory, an associate professor of Orthopedics and Pediatrics at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, said new research and attention on concussions has been important to raise awareness, but that he didn't want parents to be so afraid that they keep children away from sports in general.

"I do worry about the anxiety in general. ... We don't want the message to be that kids shouldn't participate in sports because of risk of injury," Gregory told ABC News Monday. The question is "what can we do to make kids safer?"

In the commentary, Dr. Lewis Margolis, a pediatrician and epidemiologist at the University of North Carolina, argued that current evidence points to football as more dangerous to the brain than other sports and that there is not enough evidence that benefits, including character building and physical fitness, is enough to outweigh the risks.

"High school football players have, by far, the highest risk of concussion of any sport," Margolis wrote. "In football, the rate of concussion is 60 percent higher than in the second ranking sport, lacrosse."

Margolis wrote that he was also troubled by the fact that a large percentage of players are African American, and that as a result they "face a disproportionate exposure to the risk of concussions and their consequences."

He advised that pediatricians should advise "discontinuation of high school football programs" until there is proof that it will not lead to long-term consequences for players.

"At present, there does not seem to be a way to reduce the number of head injuries in high school football," Margolis wrote. "There is no question that football is deeply imbedded in this community, as in U.S. culture. Our society has, however, researched other harms, such as tobacco use, alcohol-related driving, and obesity-related unhealthy diets and exercise, and successfully changed social norms."

As a counter argument, Dr. Greg Canty, medical director for the Center for Sports Medicine at the the Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, said that the medical community should push to make the sport safe but found there was not enough factual evidence to point to completely banning high school football.

"If we eliminate football, what sport is next and what is our threshold?" Canty asked in the commentary. "Who is going to be responsible for defining 'safe play?'"

While CTE is often cited as a concern for football players, Canty said the disease has only been found in relatively few players when compared to the millions who have played the sport.

"It has been found in a hundred or so deceased athletes when the sample size of former athletes is in the millions," Canty noted. "We have no idea how to apply current information about CTE to youth or living athletes. We have concerns, but no definitive answers."

Canty also pointed out that the U.S. Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention have reported a "10-fold increase in reported rates of sports-related concussions over the past decade," but that many in the medical community believe this is due to increased awareness and not increased injury.

If physicians decide to recommend banning football, they may then be forced to look at banning other sports, such as hockey, lacrosse or soccer, which also put players at risk for concussions, Canty said.

"I encourage pediatricians to look for ways to make all sports safer for our patients," Canty said. "Start by demanding certified athletic trainers at all sporting events. Be a resource for educating your community on sporting topics."

Dr. Mark Halstead, a sports medicine physician at Washington University, agreed in the commentary with Canty and said there are clear steps schools can take to reduce the risk of dangers from concussion. Among them is teaching key staff members to work with a licensed athletic trainer on site and develop an emergency action plan.

"I am often asked if I would allow either of my 2 sons to play football knowing what I do about concussions. Yes, I would," Halstead wrote in the commentary, qualifying it would only be in a program where safety was a priority. "I would only let them play in a program that encourages safety and puts an athlete’s health above winning."

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