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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A former Olympic hopeful-turned-truck driver has released a book on how to stay fit and lose weight even if you have a largely sedentary lifestyle.

Siphiwe Baleka is attempting to revolutionize the trucking industry, which has often been called one of the country's unhealthiest industries.

The fitness guru and long-haul trucker shared tips from his new book, 4-Minute Fit: The Metabolism Accelerator for the Time Crunched, Deskbound, and Stressed Out, live on ABC News' Good Morning America Tuesday.

Baleka, a former NCAA Division I athlete at Yale University who failed to qualify for the 1992 U.S. Olympic swimming trials in the 100-meter freestyle by just 0.8 seconds, became a trucker in 2008 after searching for a job that would allow him to travel.

As a truck driver, Baleka said his metabolism plummeted, and within weeks of spending all day sitting down, he gained 10 percent of his body weight.

He decided to retake control of his health, and then help other truck drivers do the same. Baleka eventually became a full-time fitness coach for the trucking company Prime Inc., where he has worked with thousands of truck drivers to help them stay fit and healthy while on the road.

Here are Baleka's top three metabolism-boosting tips:

1. "Get 4 minutes of rigorous exercise a day"
Baleka recommends getting at least four minutes of any kind of rigorous exercise every day. This activity will spike your metabolism, even if it is only done for four minutes, according to Baleka, who recommends slowly easing into up to 15 minutes of rigorous exercise every day.

2. "Spike your metabolism every 3 hours with food"
Eating a healthy snack every three hours can help keep your metabolism high, and Baleka said he found that many truck drivers would only eat one or two meals a day, which can have a crippling effect on your metabolism.

3. "Sleep the pounds off"
Baleka adds that sleep deprivation can be a big contributor to weight gain, and a lack of sleep can inhibit the body from regulating your metabolism properly.

4-Minute Fit: The Metabolism Accelerator for the Time Crunched, Deskbound, and Stressed Out hits shelves on Tuesday.

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ABC News/Mara SchiavocampoBy MARA SCHIAVOCAMPO

ABC News' Mara Schiavocampo shared her experiences after spending a day inside a metabolic chamber at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital in New York City. Schiavocampo's journey, which aired on "Good Morning America," was the first time that TV cameras were allowed to peek into a metabolic chamber, which is used to monitor your total energy expenditure and better understand how your body uses energy in everyday tasks such as resting, eating and exercising.

Three weeks ago I spent an entire day inside a vacuum-sealed metabolic chamber at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital in New York; 23-hours trapped inside a room the size of a prison cell. Why? It’s the most cutting edge way to measure how your body burns calories, and just might provide a glimpse into the future of weight management. The room has previously only been available for research purposes, and I’m one of the first people to ever use it commercially.

After analyzing the data for weeks, I finally got the results. As someone who spends a lot of time reading about health and wellness, I wasn’t expecting to learn much. Instead, I was shocked by the results. Here’s what I learned about the way I burn energy:

1. For me, good ole fashioned cardio beats high intensity interval training (HIIT)
High Intensity Interval Training, or HIIT, is one of the hottest new fitness trends. This is a training method where high intensity intervals are followed by brief periods of rest. For example, you might sprint for one minute, then walk for a minute, and repeat this cycle for 30 minutes. It’s widely believed to be one of the most efficient ways of exercising, burning more calories in less time. The chamber found that I burned more calories during a moderate steady run (10.7 per minute) than during a HIIT workout (7 calories per minute). Of course this isn’t a conclusive finding about HIIT’s effectiveness, but it surprised me because I felt like I was working much harder during HIIT.

2. After burn? Not so much
After burn is a phenomenon where your body continues burning calories at an elevated level after you’ve completed a workout. I always thought I was burning higher levels of calories for hours, even days, after an intense workout. Not so much. The chamber found that my body returned to pre-exercise calorie burning levels within 15-minutes of completing my workout. Bummer.

3. Carbs burn fast
The one thing that didn’t surprise me was seeing just how quickly my body burned through carbs. To test this, I spent six hours in a different, smaller chamber, and ate a high carb breakfast of a muffin and sugary coffee drink. My body torched those 750 calories in four hours, compared to the estimated six hours it would have taken to burn off a high-protein meal. This confirmed what most of us know instinctively; protein keeps you full longer.

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iStock/Thinkstock(SOUTH WEYMOUTH, Mass.) — A Massachusetts mother said her fifth-grader suffered severe burns after playing with homemade slime, a project she said she’s done with her daughter many times before without incident.

Siobhan Quinn said her 11-year-old daughter, Kathleen, endured second and third-degree burns on her hands after playing with the homemade slime, a "do it yourself" trend that surged in popularity this year thanks to social media.

"She was crying in pain, 'my hands hurt, my hands hurt,'" Quinn said in an interview with ABC News affiliate WCVB on Monday. "When we looked at them, they were covered in blisters."

The most common recipe for slime involves just three ingredients: Elmer’s Glue, the household cleaner Borax, and water. Users can also add a bit of food coloring for added effect.

Earlier this year, Elmer's U.S. sales rose 9 percent in the 13 weeks leading up to February 11, thanks to the popularity of slime, according to its parent company Newell Brands.

"I thought it was great," she said. "I encouraged it, bought all the stuff, and then when they were gone, I bought more. She was being a little scientist ... [Now] I feel terrible. I feel like the worst mother."

Quinn took her daughter to South Shore Hospital in South Weymouth, Massachusetts, where doctors said the injuries were likely the result of prolonged exposure to borax.

Consumer Reports' Chief Scientific Officer James Dickerson has warned about the dangers of using borax, which is meant to be a household cleaner or an additive for laundry, for other purposes, but many parents still use it.

"Just because you have it around, just because it seems to be perfectly safe for those types of applications doesn't mean it should be used in anything else, particularly household slime," Dickerson told WCVB last week.

The gooey stuff has been around for a while, but it surged in popularity this year as more parents and kids began to share their creations on social media. More than 1.2 million results appear on YouTube from a search for "homemade slime."

Quinn said she, like many moms in the country, made the slime many times before without a problem, but now she’s warning others against it.

"I've had other mothers say, 'Oh, we've made it a million times, it's fine, nothing happened to my child,'" she told WCVB. "We made it a million times, too, and nothing else happened."

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The Baby Box Company(NEW YORK) -- Alabama will give families of all newborns in the state free baby boxes in which to slumber if they take a quiz on sleep safety. The initiative, to start Wednesday, follows New Jersey and Ohio's campaigns for infant sleep safety with the Baby Box Co.

For Alabama, however, the goal is for the state to combat its higher than usual infant mortality rate, where 8.3 infants die every year out of 1,000 births, compared with the national average of 5.8 infant deaths to 1,000 births, according to officials.

"Alabama is sort of in a crisis situation," Jennifer Clary, CEO of the Los Angeles-based Baby Box Co., told ABC News while comparing the state's infant mortality rate to the other two states that have already started using the company’s resources.

About 3,500 infants die every year in the United States from sleep-related infant deaths, like Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

“If every mother in the state of Alabama used the baby box, it could cut the infant immortality rate by 22 percent,” Suzanne Booth, executive assistant for the Alabama Rural Development Office, told ABC News.

The top three causes of infant deaths in Alabama are malformations at birth, disorders from short pregnancies like low birth weights in premature babies and SIDS, according to Alabama Department of Public Health.

Alabama has set up the resources where parents can watch online videos about SIDS and safe sleep for their newborns through Baby Box University, and take a quiz to qualify for the free box. The families can pick up the boxes at a distribution center or have them mailed to their home address.

The baby box is portable, secure and comes with a firm foam mattress and tight-fitting sheet for safe sleeping. The boxes, which retail for about $70 to $225, also include breast-feeding accessories, onesie, diapers and wipes.

“It feels to me sometimes that I’m doing more for these families by giving them the education, and giving them the box, than by actually being their midwife during labor,” Celina Cunanan, director of the division of nurse-midwifery for University Hospitals/Case Medical Center in Cleveland, told ABC News.

Infant mortality rates among black infants were also three times higher than white infants in Alabama, even though there are nearly double the number of white infant births in 2015, according to the state.

Here are some tips the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends to create a safe sleep environment for an infant:

  • Place the baby on his or her back on a firm sleep surface such as a crib or bassinet with a tight-fitting sheet.
  • Avoid use of soft bedding, including crib bumpers, blankets, pillows and soft toys. The crib should be bare.
  • Share a bedroom with parents, but not the same sleeping surface, preferably until the baby turns 1 but at least for the first six months. Room-sharing decreases the risk of SIDS by as much as 50 percent.
  • Avoid baby's exposure to smoke, alcohol and illicit drugs.

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Ingram Publishing/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- With drug overdoses causing tens of thousands of deaths every year in the U.S., physicians are calling for the crisis to be treated like a medical emergency.

On Monday, the American College of Physicians (ACP) published a position paper arguing that action needs to be taken by the medical community and others to stem the crisis, especially in light of the massive growth of the opioid epidemic.

"Twenty-two million people need treatment and a large percentage of people aren't getting treatment," Dr. Nitin S. Damle, president of the American College of Physicians, told ABC News, citing national statistics compiled by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC). "We want to focus the spotlight on that."

In the paper, the ACP is making a host of new recommendations on the basis that substance abuse should be considered a chronic disease that needs ongoing treatment, not a "moral disorder or character defect."

Damle said compared to other chronic diseases such as high blood pressure or diabetes, where 75 percent of people get treatment, just 18 percent of people with substance abuse disorders get treatment, according to CDC statistics.

The ACP paper emphasizes shifting the focus to treatment, rather than punishment, for drug addiction, including opioids. They said they would like to see tighter controls for opioid prescriptions, more training in the medical community to deal with substance abuse and more options for patients to receive mental health treatment.

In addition, the ACP advocates for policies that give non-violent drug offenders the option to receive treatment and reduced prison sentences for possession.

"We need to have more treatment programs and we need to have more funding in this area," Damle explained. "It's a heavy societal burden it really endangers families and not just individuals."

Physicians can make a huge difference in combating the substance abuse epidemic by limiting the amount of opioids they prescribe, Damle added. Checking databases to ensure patients aren't getting opioid drugs from other doctors and taking additional courses on substance abuse to better treat disorders can also help, he said.

Opioid abuse remains a deadly crisis in the U.S. An estimated 91 people fatally overdose on opioids every day, according to the CDC, and approximately 52,000 died from drug overdoses in 2015.

Dr. Caleb Alexander, Co-Director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Drug Safety and Effectiveness, said the paper is "welcome news" given how little help there is for people suffering from substance abuse disorders.

"There is a huge gap between the need for these services and their delivery," Alexander said. "Millions of Americans need treatment for an illicit drug or alcohol use problem yet don’t receive."

"This is all the more shocking because it’s a good investment," he continued. "For every dollar invested in drug prevention and treatment, we save money as a society –- we can either pay for it now, or pay for it later."

Alexander said the fact that the paper emphasizes treatment for substance addiction rather than incarceration is important.

"When it comes to opioids, we should be talking about addiction, not abuse," he said. "Addiction is a disease, abuse is a behavior."

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iStock/Thinkstock(PHILADELPHIA) — A trio of runners were caught on camera coming to the aid of a fatigued runner whose legs appeared to buckle within sight of the finish line of a half-marathon in Philadelphia on Sunday.

Video shows the unnamed female runner struggling to hold herself up as she nears the end of the Philadelphia Love Run Half-Marathon.

A fellow runner in a long-sleeved green shirt running on the woman’s right stops and grabs her arm while another male runner on the woman’s left stops and grabs her left arm.

The two men and the woman, who all appear to be strangers, then jog together towards the finish line at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

With dozens of runners passing them by, the two men continue to help the female runner as she becomes more and more unstable and nearly unable to run.

Just steps from the finish line, the woman almost collapses. At that point, a third runner, wearing the same long-sleeved green shirt as one of the first two runners who stopped, halts his finish line sprint and circles back to the female runner.

The third runner then picks the woman up and carries her to the finish line, putting her down just inches from the line so she can finish the race on her own two feet.

The clock above the finish line shows the four runners all finished the race in just over two hours.

Ten-thousand runners completed the race on Sunday, Philadelphia Love Run Half-Marathon race director Michele Redrow told ABC News. Race officials have identified the female runner but have not yet released her name.

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Phil McCarten/CBS(HOUSTON) -- Ebony Banks, the Houston teen battling a rare form of cancer, has died -- just days after her wish to speak to her idol Beyonce was fulfilled.

A spokesman for Alief Independent School District, where Banks was a student, confirmed that she passed away early Sunday morning.

"I understand she had a smile on her face till the very end," spokesman Craig Eichhorn told ABC News.

Hours later, the students at Alief Hastings High School, from which Banks had recently graduated and where she was a member of the color guard for four years, organized a candlelight vigil in the band practice lot.

Members of the color guard held their candles up in the air and swayed along to the song "Halo" by Beyonce.

They were the same folks who had organized a social media campaign more than a week ago to get Beyonce to meet Banks, using the teen's nickname Ebob and the hashtag #EbobMeetsBeyonce.

After Beyonce made the FaceTime call to Banks last Wednesday, friends and fans took to Twitter to celebrate and post pictures of the big moment.

In the clip, Banks tells Beyonce that she loves her, and the singer replies, "I love you."

Beyoncé facetiming with Ebony, a fan with a rare cancer disease whose last wish was to see Beyoncé. ❤️️💙 pic.twitter.com/pCkGzF4feZ

— BEYONCÉ LEGION (@Bey_Legion) March 22, 2017

Banks was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer last summer and started chemotherapy in September, according to her band director, Paul Brodt.

But Brodt told ABC News last week that Banks still made every effort to attend school as well as color guard practice and competitions. In fact, she showed up at a competition earlier this month before her health took a turn for the worse.

Afterward, Banks remained in the hospital and received her high school diploma at a special ceremony held at MD Anderson and attended by 100 people -- including her 23 color guard teammates, school faculty members, school administrators and hospital staffers.

It was at her special graduation that the campaign to meet Beyonce was launched.

"Our kids love her ... and would do anything for her," Brodt said last week. "She's inspired everybody -- me along with all of our kids."

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The Lambert Family(RICHMOND, Va.) -- A Virginia fire department is coming together in support of a fellow fireman's toddler, who is fighting cancer.

The Richmond Fire Department has raised close to $50,000 after 3-year-old Caleb Lambert was diagnosed with stage 3 neuroblastoma in February, dad Courtland Lambert told ABC News.

"Me and my wife are extremely humbled," said Lambert, a resident of Mechanicsville, Virginia. "You don't ever think that your child is going to have to go through something like that. We've quickly realized how much a text or phone call can mean ... you feel so grateful from the outpouring of support from everybody."

Lambert, a 15-year firefighter and dad of three, informed his colleagues that his son had cancer immediately after he was diagnosed.

"You live with these people for 24 hours a day; on average, we work about 10 days a month," Lambert said. "The fire department as a whole is probably around 400 to 415 people ... they've been working shifts for me so I don't even have to use my time. The fire [department] is a brotherhood and a sisterhood. ... I'm glad that it's been there for me when I needed it."

Caleb has been receiving chemotherapy treatments at VCU Medical Center in Richmond.

The station immediately began fundraising for Caleb's medical expenses, Lambert's fellow firefighter Betty Migliaccchio told ABC News.

"We went back to the station that night and started talking about how this is going to be big," Migliaccchio said. "We started to figure out how we were going to get [Lambert's] shifts covered. We work so well together that when something happens in a family, it touches us personally."

Since Caleb loves fire trucks and visiting "Daddy's fire station," Migliaccchio asked fellow firefighters to send videos of them giving tours of their own firehouses to the Facebook page Team Caleb -- something Caleb's dad would do over FaceTime each night before bedtime.

Soon, the videos came pouring in from all over the world, Migliaccchio said.

Over the next month, the firefighters of Station 1 in Richmond launched a GoFundMe and sold T-shirts. On Saturday, they raffled off a truck and shaved their heads in honor of Caleb, partnering with the St. Baldrick's Foundation for a fundraiser.

"Fundraising events, like the one on March 25, and volunteers, like the firefighters of Richmond, are why the St. Baldrick’s Foundation is now the largest private funder of childhood cancer research grants," said Kathleen Ruddy, St. Baldrick’s chief executive officer. "The foundation’s success in funding lifesaving research for kids like Caleb Lambert wouldn’t be possible without them.”

Migliaccchio hopes the weekend helped meet the fundraising goal of $100,000 for Caleb and his family, she said.

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ABC NewsBy PAIGE MORE

"Good Morning America" booker and segment producer Paige More shares her personal experience of under going a double mastectomy in her early 20s after she tested positive for a BRCA1 genetic mutation, which greatly increases your risk of developing breast cancer, according to the National Cancer Foundation.

I have always been fearless. I grew up snowboarding, surfing, and cliff diving in southern California. New adventures excite me and nothing stresses me out. I have always believed that no matter what happens in my life, I can handle it.

That all changed when I was 22 years old and tested positive for the BRCA1 genetic mutation. I had just started working as a booker for Good Morning America, when my mom urged me to take the test. I didn't think much of it as I was busy trying to prove myself at my new dream job. I figured if it would make my mom happy, then I would take the test. I found out a few weeks later that I had tested positive when my doctor called me with my mom on the line. They both told me they were sorry. I still didn't really understand.

It wasn't until a few months later when my mom came to visit me in the city that the gravity of the mutation set in. It is so important to make sure you are ready for the results before you get tested. We didn't understand how much this was going to impact my life. It is so important to be prepared for the results. I was told that I essentially had two options. I could begin intensive surveillance programs, which meant endless visits to the doctor's office for mammograms, MRIs and blood work. That felt like waiting around to get cancer. My other option was to have a preventative double mastectomy. I left my oncologist's office feeling overwhelmed and scared of my future for the first time in my life.

I spent the next few months talking with my close friends and family. Everyone was incredibly supportive. But no one told me what to do. I really wanted some guidance either way. Should I have the surgery or should I wait until I was older? What if cancer struck while I was waiting? What was I waiting for?

I was never a worrier or an anxious person and I worried about getting cancer every single day. Every time I tried on a new top, took a shower, or looked in the mirror I thought, "I am going to get breast cancer." It was so overwhelming I realized I couldn't live in constant fear anymore.

Fortunately, I was in a great place in my life and I felt like I was ready to have a preventative double mastectomy. My friends, family, and boyfriend were incredibly supportive. I had a stable and steady job. I was healthy and fit. I knew I didn't want to worry and I knew that I would most likely have to do this someday anyway. I was ready now. I wanted to do everything in my power to be a "Previvor," not a survivor.

A previvor is someone who is a survivor of a predisposition to cancer but who hasn't had the disease. This group includes people who carry a hereditary mutation, a family history of cancer, or some other predisposing factor.

In October, we set my surgery date for January 3. I had 90 days to really prepare. I asked my doctors if I should do anything to better prep myself for surgery. They said no. I didn't listen. I joined the gym across from my office and started working out regularly. I ate as healthfully as I could. I made sure I was in the best shape of my life for January 3.

Walking into surgery was one of the strangest experiences in my life. I wanted to turn and run away, but I knew I had to face this head on, like I do with everything else in my life. After a few hours my doctors came out to tell my parents that the surgery had gone incredibly well, in part because my muscles were so strong and I was so healthy. I am so thankful I chose to be proactive and make sure my body was as strong as possible before my surgery. It gave me something other than the surgery to focus on and gave me a sense of power that I had control back over my body. Having a strong core and legs helped me so much during my recovery.

I never intended to share my story. Before my surgery, I looked up double mastectomies online and only saw horror stories and worst-case scenarios. I read how women no longer felt feminine or struggled with their body image after having their breasts removed. I was terrified of feeling the same way. I felt like I had no one to talk to. I felt completely alone. After my surgery I flew home to California to recover and to be close by my family.

While I was home, my little sister who is 13 and loves Instagram, wanted to take some photos of me. I didn't really want to because I expected to be disappointed by what I looked like. But my little sister hasn't been tested for the genetic mutation yet and I wanted her to see that I was still the same big sister and that my surgery hadn't changed me. I also didn't want her to be scared about getting tested for the genetic mutation in the future.

When she showed me the photos she took I couldn't believe how much I loved them and how I looked. I couldn't believe how beautiful I felt. I actually felt sexier than I have ever felt in my life because I knew I took control of my body and potentially saved my own life. That made me feel so empowered and strong. My scars reminded me of this decision and made me feel beautiful. So we continued taking photos and I began posting them to my personal social media accounts.

The response was incredible. People were so supportive. Women from all over the world were reaching out to me, thanking me for sharing and being so open. I felt like I couldn't stop. I wanted people to know that you can have a double mastectomy and it doesn't have to ruin your life. Not only was I happy, I was no longer worrying about the risk of getting breast cancer.

As I continued to post, I started connecting with more and more women. I quickly realized I needed a separate space to post about my experience. I created an Instagram, @paige_previvor, so women going through similar situations would be able to reach me.

Through sharing my story on Instagram I quickly realized that there are a ton of other women who feel similarly to me. I felt compelled to do everything in my power to prevent other young women like me from feeling alone. Through Instagram I have formed a community of young women who have been affected by breast cancer in some capacity.

Rather than having to sit in a stuffy support group meeting, I have started setting up events around the city where we can get together in a comfortable and fun environment -- I call them my breast friends! I hope to give them a platform to share their stories and find a way to help women all over the world connect with each other through Our Move Movement.

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Brissey Photography(MEDIAPOLIS, Iowa) -- There must be something in the water at one Iowa fire station.

Six volunteer fire fighters at the Mediapolis Fire Department welcomed six children in the last seven months.

"We didn't have a plan to do this," Captain Troy Garrison, who welcomed a daughter named Emma four months ago, with his wife Dina, told ABC News. "But I think the stars just kind of aligned and the timing for us individually as families just worked out."

Along with Garrison, 36, firefighters Cody Tisor, Seth Eberhardt, Skyler Schwerin, Adam Welp, and Captain Tom Brockett also welcomed children.

Brockett, who's been volunteering at the fire station since 2001, and his wife Megan were the last to tell the group they were expecting. Three weeks ago, the two welcomed Neva.

And although Brockett said he and his wife of nearly four years were "really happy" for the other couples, it was hard as they were privately going through in vitro fertilization.

"We were just really praying that we'd get to be part of that," he said. "And then finally we got to come out [and say] 'We're pregnant.' We were the last ones so ... it was fun. We were happy."

Adam Welp, who's been volunteering for three years, told ABC News he was just happy to welcome all of the new fathers to the fold.

He and his wife of four years, Katie, welcomed their second child, Kalvin, six weeks ago. Welp, 29, is also a father to a 2-year-old daughter named Kolby.

"For me, it's kind of fun because a couple of the guys -- like Tom and Troy -- they're a little older than me but this was their first child," Welp said. "It was fun to be younger, but showing them the ropes."

The first time the six firefighters got their new children together was at a photo shoot with local photographer, Debbie Brissey.

"It was a blast," Welp recalled, adding that his wife created the babies' skirts and trousers on her maternity leave thanks to "some old retired gear."

The firefighters, who are among 25 volunteers at the station, said their dedication to their community won't change, and they already have a plan just in case they're all called to fight a fire and they can't find a babysitter.

"The plan is just for everyone to go to the fire station and hopefully one of the wives will be there to hand our kids off to," Brockett said.

Still, putting on their gear will be harder for some.

"I remember the first time I went [to fight a fire] after having my daughter," Garrison recalled. "But you get on the truck and recheck your priorities.

"We still have a job to do," he added. "The public depends on us to do our job the best we can."

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iStock/Thinkstock(LONDON) -- In an effort to improve survival rates of patients, the cancer research charity Cancer Research UK has launched a major study to find efficient and effective treatment for individual tumors according to a BBC News report.

The study is called the PRECISION-Panc project.

Researchers at Glasgow University in Scotland will receive over $12 million in funding, BBC reports.

The project is presented amid a rise in pancreatic cancer rates in Scotland. The rate of diagnosis has increased 12% over the past 10 years according to BBC News, a rise of approximately 170 people.

The research will take place over three stages, with potentially more trials to come in the future.

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Brad Barket/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- It's been 16 years since Audra McDonald had a baby.

Now at age 46, the "Beauty and the Beast" star has a second baby and a first with her husband and fellow Broadway star Will Swenson.

The couple welcomed daughter Sally James last October.

McDonald said she has changed as a mother since the first time around.

"I’m calmer this time around, 16 years later," she told People magazine. "Or maybe it’s that I’m just tired because I’m older, but I don’t sweat the small stuff as much."

#BeautyAndTheBeast's Audra McDonald opens up about becoming a mom again at 46 https://t.co/AEiHA9PpC3 pic.twitter.com/vNJoJyvxU6

— People Magazine (@people) March 25, 2017

And although Sally James is only 5 months old, she already has a larger-than-life personality, her mother said.

"In some ways, I don’t worry about her — this is a very strong personality, I’m seeing it already!" she said. "This is someone who’s not gonna let anybody walk over her at all. In fact, she’ll be the one doing the walking."

When the six-time Tony Award winner announced her pregnancy, she said it was unexpected.

"Who knew that tap dancing during perimenopause could lead 2 pregnancy? @thewillswenson & I are completely surprised but elated 2 b expecting," she wrote on Twitter last May.

Who knew that tap dancing during perimenopause could lead 2 pregnancy? @thewillswenson & I are completely surprised but elated 2 b expecting

— Audra McDonald (@AudraEqualityMc) May 10, 2016

McDonald, who formerly starred on the ABC series "Private Practice," also has a daughter, Zoe, from a previous marriage, and Swenson has two sons with his former wife.

"Zoe is such a fantastic big sister to Sally James," McDonald said of her older daughter. "That’s just who she wants to hang out with. Every time Zoe walks into the room, Sally lights up. And that’s so important to me."

"Zoe is a rock star as far as Sally James is concerned," she added. "If you wanna make me melt, just put my two daughters together, and I’m a puddle."

McDonald and Swenson, 43, married in 2012 at their home in Croton-on-Hudson, New York.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- What if your health coverage was more like a gym membership?

Shellee Enfinger and her husband support their family of five by paying $250 per month for health coverage. She said with direct primary care or "membership medicine" she can text her doctors, who are available 24-7.

Enfinger said she was paying as much as her mortgage payment for health insurance.
Now by paying a monthly fee for direct primary care, she avoids spending money on high premiums and deductibles.

"We pay a membership, just like a gym membership or anything you pay monthly," Enfinger said.
But health experts warn it doesn't provide the same coverage as health insurance, unless you pay extra for catastrophic insurance.

"I think it's not good for people who don't have a lot of discretionary income, who are fooled into thinking it's insurance-- when it isn't-- who do not understand that they may be just a block away from a catastrophic health event," Prof. Carolyn Engelhard, of University of Virginia's School of Medicine, told ABC News.


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UCLA Health(LOS ANGELES) -- For years, Justin Cho's family thought they simply had a happy kid who liked to laugh, even when nothing funny happened.

"Ever since he was an infant he would giggle and it would be very short lived, anywhere between 2 to 5 seconds," Justin's father, Robert Cho, said on the UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital website.

However, these chuckles didn't mean Justin was laughing. His giggle fits were actually seizures and a sign he had a rare form of epilepsy called gelastic epilepsy. The family realized something was wrong when Justin's condition progressed and he had a full-fledged traditional epileptic seizure.

At UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital, doctors saw on an MRI scan that Justin, 9, had a benign mass, or lesion, in his brain. This lesion, called a hypothalamic hamartoma, can cause developmental delay, cognitive deterioration and psychiatric symptoms such as rage behaviors, according to the National Organization for Rare Disorders.

Dr. Aria Fallah, a pediatric neurosurgeon at UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital who treated Justin, told ABC News that the area where the lesion occurred is deep within the brain and vital to keeping the body functioning normally.

"The challenges of treating it is that medications don't usually work, and left untreated it can cause cognitive impairment," Fallah said.

Hypothalamic hamartoma is usually present since birth, but most parents don't realize anything is wrong until years later, Fallah explained.

"It usually takes a long time," said Fallah. "Not many parents think giggling is problem, they think 'Oh my child is happy.'"

In order to help Justin recover without doing open surgery on his brain, doctors instead were able to fix the lesion by using laproscopic tools, which is much less invasive than traditional surgery. The hypothalmus is deep in the brain and near the pituitary gland. Any injury to this area can mean a dangerous brain bleed or ongoing issues later with growth, hormones and other issues.

Once inside the brain, surgeons were able to destroy the lesion with an optic laser, minimizing damage to other vital tissue. A long thin rod was inserted into the brain, and through virtual reality maping, surgeons were able to get the tool to the mass and minimize the harm to other areas of the brain.

"It heats up the tissue to the point till it's destroyed," Fallah explained.

After the lesion is destroyed, no new seizures are expected unless another lesion forms. Since the surgery is much less invasive, it also means less recovery time for the patient.

"There's essentially no recovery time," Fallah explained to ABC News. "By the time he wakes up, he almost ready to leave."

Now, six months after the surgery, Justin has had no new seizures, according to Fallah.

"Prior to this you'd see bursts of himself," Fallah said. "Now he's more of himself."

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ABC/Eric McCandless(NEW YORK) — Julianne Hough hopes being vocal about her struggle with endometriosis will help more women feel comfortable talking about their own experiences. In an interview with People, she talked about her diagnosis.

"When I was 15, I had symptoms of endometriosis, but I had never heard of it, didn't know what it was," she said. "I thought that this was just the kind of pain you have when you're on your period. For years, I was just thinking that it was normal and never really talked about it."

After being rushed to the hospital in 2008, she found out about her condition and soon had surgery.

"The first initial thought was a little bit of fear because I didn't know what it was, especially because it's not talked about as much as it is today," Hough said. "And then also relief because I was able to put a name to the pain, and know there were treatments and I could talk to my doctor and create a plan to help manage the pain."

She's now working with a campaign to raise awareness of endometriosis. She said it's about starting an open conversation about symptoms.

"I don't care about being private about this anymore because I really want the women that are going through debilitating pain to benefit from my story or this campaign," the Dancing With the Stars judge said.

She's made some adjustments since her diagnosis — she slows down when she needs to, and takes days off when necessary, but said she still leads an active, healthy lifestyle. Her fiancé, Brooks Laich, has been a source of support, Hough said.

"He's amazing," she said. "The first time he found out about it was because I was having an episode, and I couldn't even speak. As soon as it passed, I was able to tell him what it was. Now he knows when I'm having a little episode, and just rubs my back and is there for me and supports me. There's comfort in knowing that the people around me get it and understand, so I don't feel like I have to push through the pain because I don't want to look weak."

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