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Rakeyia Scott(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) -- Charlotte-Mecklenburg, North Carolina, released some of the department's tapes of the fatal shooting of Keith Lamont Scott, which has sparked days of protests across the city.

Police Chief Kerr Putney announced the release at a news conference Saturday, saying that other footage will come later.

In the dash cam video Scott is seen exiting his car, he then walks backwards with his hands before four shots are heard. It is unclear whether there is anything in his hands.

The actual shooting is neither seen nor heard in the body cam footage.

Officer Brentley Vinson, identified by police as the officer who shot Scott, cannot be seen firing his weapon in either video.

The chief says the tapes show that Scott was "absolutely" in possession of a handgun and will offer "indisputable evidence" of the department's account, and he said that at this point, he the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department will not be charging any officer in the shooting. The North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation is also investigating the case.

Police also released photos of a handgun and holster and of a marijuana "blunt" that were taken as evidence in the case.

Putney said officers were conducting surveillance related to a warrant they intended to serve on someone else, but their attention was drawn to Scott. They saw marijuana and a weapon in Scott's car and said believed, "this is a safety issue for us and the public," the police chief said.

He said Scott was shot after he did not follow police commands to drop his weapon.

"At every encounter, people can make a decision to follow loud, verbal commands. They (officers) were reacting to what they saw and they have a duty to do so," Putney said.

He added that he believes the footage can now be released without jeopardizing the investigation.

Ray Dotch, Scott's brother-in-law, said at a press conference this evening that the family was glad that the body camera and dashcam videos have been released but added that unfortunately the family is left with more questions than answered.

Justin Bamberg, a lawyer for the Scott family said, that they appreciate that their request for the video release was heard and that it is another step in the pursuit for all the facts, but said that in his opinion, he does not see Scott look aggressive or lunge at officers.

Charles Monnett, another attorney at the press conference said that the community should express their opinions but should do it lawfully and peacefully.

The police announcement came after hundreds of people gathered in Charlotte's Marshall Park demanding the release of the police video footage, marching peacefully under the hot sun in, chanting and holding signs that said "Release the Tape."

Calls to release the footage had intensified after Scott's family released cell phone video of the moments leading up to and after the shooting Tuesday.

A woman identified as Scott's wife, Rakeyia Scott, recorded the incident with her phone and the video was provided to ABC News on Friday by attorneys for the Scott family. In the video, Rakeyia Scott can be heard pleading with police to not shoot her husband, a 43-year-old black man, as officers order the man to "drop the gun." As the encounter continues, the woman yells back at police, insisting her husband is harmless and doesn't have a weapon.

"He doesn't have a gun," she says. "He has a T.B.I. [traumatic brain injury]. He's not going to do anything to you guys. He just took his medicine."

Police repeatedly scream at Keith Lamont Scott to "drop the gun" and, moments later, multiple gunshots ring out. The actual shooting is not shown on the video as Rakeyia Scott points her cellphone at the ground and screams, "Did you shoot him?" She then runs closer to the scene, angling the cellphone camera this time at the spot where her husband was shot. Scott's body is seen lying in the street surrounded by several officers.

The cellphone video was the first footage of Scott's deadly encounter with police to be publicly released. One of the attorneys representing the Scott family, Charles G. Monnett, said they released the video "in the name of truth and transparency."

During the rally Saturday in Charlotte, activists and religious leaders joined protesters' calls for investigators to release the videos. Corine Mack, president of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg NAACP, told the crowd amid cheers that the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) had launched an investigation into the case.

The DOJ's Community Relations Service has said it is "is working to maintain open lines of communication and ease tension in Charlotte," but the department has not yet decided whether to open an investigation. A Justice Department spokesman said Attorney General Loretta Lynch's remarks from Thursday, indicating the department is monitoring the case, still stand.

The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department said its officers were searching for a suspect who had an outstanding warrant when they encountered Scott in a vehicle outside an apartment complex around 4 p.m. Tuesday. Police said Scott was not the suspect that officers sought but that he was holding a handgun, which investigators recovered from the scene, and posed a threat because he was not obeying police orders to remain inside his car and drop the weapon.

Officer Vinson subsequently fired his gun, striking Scott, who police said was treated immediately and later pronounced dead, police said.

Vinson, who has been employed with the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department since July 21, 2014, and is currently assigned to the metro division. He has been placed on paid administrative leave while the investigation into Scott's death is ongoing, according to Putney.

Vinson, who is black, was not wearing a body camera at the time.

Scott's family maintains he was not holding a gun and he was just waiting for his son to be dropped off from school. Justin Bamberg, a lawyer representing Scott's family, said in a statement Thursday that it's "impossible" to detect from the police footage what Scott is holding and at no point did Scott appear or act aggressively.

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iStock/Thinkstock(BURLINGTON, Wash.) --  A manhunt continued Saturday for an unidentified suspect in a shooting at a Seattle-area mall Friday night that killed five people.

The suspected gunman entered the Cascade Mall in Burlington, Washington, about 65 miles north of Seattle, and 10 minutes later, at about 7 p.m. local time, opened fire in the makeup department of Macy's, police said.

Surveillance video images released by authorities showed that the suspect, whom police described as Hispanic and in his late teens or early 20s, went into the mall without the rifle that he shortly after brandished in the department store.

Four women, ranging in age from teens to seniors, were killed, and a man who had sustained life-threatening injuries died at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle early Saturday morning, several hours after he was taken there, said Sgt. Mark Francis, a public information officer with the Washington State Patrol.

Skagit County Coroner Hayley Thompson said at a press conference Saturday morning that the victims' identities will be released once autopsies are complete and next of kin notified.

Police believe the suspect acted alone, and the FBI said it has no indication at this point that the shooting is linked to terrorism.

"We have no indication this was a terrorism act," Michael Knutson, assistant special agent in charge of the Seattle FBI, said at the press conference. "There is no evidence to support that."

But Knutson cautioned, "I cannot discount it."

Mount Vernon Police Lt. Chris Cammock said the motive for the deadly shooting is unknown.

Law enforcement officers responding to the shooting locked down the mall and searched it thoroughly, but later found out that the suspect had fled prior to their arrival, police said, adding that they had recovered the suspected weapon.

Police said the suspect was last seen walking toward Interstate 5, and they appealed to the public for help in identifying and finding him.

"We could certainly use the community's help on that," Cammock told reporters Saturday morning.

If anyone has information about the #CascadeMallShooting suspect, please call police 360-428-3211 or scinv@co.skagit.wa.us pic.twitter.com/uN6a5AYixd

— Skagit County DEM (@SkagitDEM) September 24, 2016

Police initially said four people were dead, but then revised the figure to three, before updating it back to four fatalities. And police initially said one female sustained non-life threatening injuries, but that was incorrect. Sgt. Francis of the state patrol said the numbers fluctuated as authorities searched the 434,000 square-foot mall and surrounding parking lot, which remain closed for the investigation.

Mall employees and shoppers said they hid in stores and fitting rooms during the shooting.

"Out of nowhere I just hear somebody yell and then after that, I turn around and just look at the Macy's and I just hear shots," Armando Patino, who was working at the mall's T-Mobile store, told ABC affiliate KOMO. "I hear one shot and then stand kinda still and like two three other people start running out saying gun."

Patino added, "I turn around and run to the store. Some people didn't know where to go. I just moved them into the [T-Mobile] store. We went in the back where we have a door and everything and we just stayed there until they told us to evacuate."

 Stephanie Bose, an assistant general manager at Johnny Carino's Italian restaurant near Macy's department store at the mall, told The Associated Press she immediately locked the doors to the restaurant after hearing about the shooting from an employee's boyfriend.

"He was trying to go to the mall and people were screaming," Bose said. "It was frantic."

And Tari Caswell, a shopper in the women's dressing room in Macy's told the Skagit Valley Herald she heard "what sounded like four balloons popping."

"Then I heard seven or eight more, and I just stayed quiet in the dressing room because it just didn't feel right. And it got very quiet," Caswell said. "And then I heard a lady yelling for help, and a man came and got me and another lady, and we ran out of the store."

 Approximately 200 local and regional law enforcement officers from more than 26 agencies responded to the shooting Friday night to secure the scene and evacuate employees and patrons. Authorities performed an initial sweep of the mall to ensure it had been evacuated, followed by a secondary search. Police said they spent at least an hour interviewing some 20 witnesses that evening.

Additionally, both the FBI and the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives are assisting the investigation.

 In a statement Friday night, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee urged residents "heed all safety and detour warnings. Stay close to your friends and loved ones as we await more information and, hopefully, news of the suspect's capture."

And at the news conference Saturday morning, Burlington Mayor Steve Sexton called the shooting a "senseless act" that has forever changed the city.

"But I don't think our way of life needs to change forever," Sexton told reporters. "We're going to get beyond this.

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ZACH GIBSON/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) --  President Obama said Saturday that the nation's new African-American history museum opening in Washington, D.C., tells "an essential part of our American story."

"This national museum helps to tell a richer and fuller story of who we are," Obama said at the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. "It helps us better understand the lives, yes, of the president but also the slave, the industrialist but also the porter, the keeper of the status quo but also the activist seeking to overthrow that status quo."

The president visibly shed several tears as he told about his rides on Marine One over the National Mall watching the museum get built and thinking that one day he would visit it with his grandchildren during which he’d “hold a little hand” and “tell them the stories that are enshrined here.”

“We’ll learn about ourselves as Americans,” Obama said of the museum. “We’ll walk away that much more in love with this country. The only place on earth where this story could have unfolded.”

Obama said the history displayed in the museum is “a story that perhaps needs to be told now more than ever.”

“What this museum does show us is that even in the face of oppression, even in the face of unimaginable difficulty, America has moved forward,” the president said. “It is in this embrace of truth as best as we can know it and the celebration of the entire American experience where real patriotism lies.”

After his speech, Obama rang in the opening by clanging a 500-pound bell from the First Baptist Church in Williamsburg, Virginia, which was founded by slaves and free blacks in 1776.

The president and first lady Michelle Obama sat on the stage alongside former first lady Laura Bush and President George W. Bush, who in 2003 signed into law a bill to move forward with the building of the museum.

Also in attendance at the star-studded ceremony were former Pres. Bill Clinton, Chief Justice John Roberts, Will Smith, Oprah Winfrey, Vice President Biden, House Speaker Paul Ryan and former Secretary of State Colin Powell.

The Obamas have visited the museum twice ahead of its official opening. On Sept. 14, the first family got a private sneak preview of the museum, and then visited again this week where the president and first lady told "Good Morning America's" Robin Roberts of the museum's significance to children across the country.

“What I think you want is for this generation of kids to come away thinking, ‘Yeah, everybody can do everything,’ that if you're a little white boy or a little white girl, little black boy, little black girl, a Latino, Asian, if you grow up and you are gay or straight, if you are disabled, that you're empowered,” he said.

Also to be in attendance at the opening Saturday are former President George W. Bush and former First Lady Laura Bush. It was Bush who in 2003 signed into law a bill to move forward with the building of the museum. Construction broke ground on the National Mall in 2012.

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iStock/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) -- Varying interpretations have emerged of the videos that are said to show the police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina, after both law enforcement and the victim's family viewed the footage.

The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department said its officers were searching for a suspect who had an outstanding warrant when they encountered Scott, a 43-year-old black man, in a vehicle outside an apartment complex around 4 p.m. Tuesday. Police said Scott was not the suspect that officers sought but that he was holding a handgun, which investigators recovered from the scene, and posed a threat because he was not obeying police orders to remain inside his car and drop the weapon.

An officer subsequently fired his gun, hitting Scott, who police said was treated immediately and later pronounced dead. Police have identified the officer involved in the shooting as Brentley Vinson, who has been employed with the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department since July 21, 2014, and is currently assigned to the metro division. He has been placed on paid administrative leave while the investigation into Scott's death is ongoing, according to Police Chief Kerr Putney. Vinson is African-American.

Vinson was not wearing a body camera at the time, but the other officers who responded to the incident were, police said. A dashboard camera also recorded the incident. Police have not publicly released any footage but Scott's family have reviewed the video that shows the moment when police fatally shot the man, the family's attorney told ABC News on Thursday.

What Police Say About the Videos

The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department said the footage shows Scott with a gun in his hand during his interaction with police officers before he was shot and killed. Police also told ABC News that the gun seen in pictures taken at the scene is the weapon they recovered.

However, Police Chief Putney admitted that the videos he reviewed do not provide "definitive visual evidence that would confirm that a person is pointing a gun."

"I did not see that in the videos that I reviewed," he told reporters Thursday. "So what I can tell you, though, is when taken in the totality of all the other evidence, it supports what we've heard and the version of the truth that we gave about the circumstances that happened that led to the death of Mr. Scott."

 Putney also said the video evidence alone does not establish whether the shooting was justified.

"We have yet to make a case solely on video," he said at a news conference today. "However, it can be compelling."

According to Putney, officers in the videos gave Scott "loud, clear, verbal commands" before Officer Vinson shot him.

"The officers gave loud, clear, verbal commands, which were also heard by many of the witnesses," the police chief said at a news conference Wednesday. "Mr. Scott exited his vehicle armed with a handgun as the officers continued to yell at him to drop it."

What the Family Says About the Videos


Scott's family has said he was holding a book, not a gun, while waiting for his son to be dropped off from school. After reviewing the footage, the family's attorney said in a statement that it's "impossible" to detect what Scott is holding and at no point did Scott appear or act aggressively.

"After watching the videos, the family again has more questions than answers," Justin Bamberg, a lawyer representing Scott's family, said in the statement Thursday. "When told by police to exit his vehicle, Mr. Scott did so in a very calm, non-aggressive manner. While police did give him several commands, he did not aggressively approach them or raise his hands at members of law enforcement at any time. It is impossible to discern from the videos what, if anything, Mr. Scott is holding in his hands."

When Bamberg spoke with ABC News today, he said there appears to be an object in Scott's left hand. But Scott was right-handed, Bamberg said, which raises the question as to why he would be holding a gun in his non-dominant hand if he were to shoot someone.

And even if Scott were in fact holding a gun, it's questionable as to whether he should have been shot and killed, Bamberg told ABC News.

 Attorneys for the Scott family provided ABC News with a cellphone video of Scott's encounter with police. The video was taken by a woman identified as Scott's wife, Rakeyia Scott, who can be heard pleading with police to not shoot her husband as officers order the man to "drop the gun."

In the video, Rakeyia Scott yells back at police, insisting her husband is harmless and doesn't have a weapon.

"He doesn't have a gun," she says. "He has a T.B.I. [traumatic brain injury]. He's not going to do anything to you guys. He just took his medicine."

Police continue to yell at Scott to "drop the gun" and, moments later, multiple gunshots ring out. The actual shooting is not shown on the video as Rakeyia Scott points her cellphone at the ground and screams, "Did you shoot him?" She then runs closer to the scene, angling the cellphone camera this time at the spot where her husband was shot. Scott's body is seen lying in the street surrounded by several officers.

The cellphone video is the first footage of Scott's encounter with police to be publicly released.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  A police officers' association in California bought a bicycle for a local teenager after one cop discovered that he walks four hours to and from work every day.

Corporal Kirk Keffer of the Benicia Police Department found Jourdan Duncan, 19, walking home late one night last week, and offered to give him a ride, the Benicia Police Officers' Association said in a statement on its website.

Duncan shared his story with Keffer, telling the cop that he was saving money for college and did not have a car or bicycle. He walks from Vallejo, where he lives, to Benicia in order to get to work, according to the association. The two towns are about 8 miles apart.

Keffer then shared the youth's story with the rest of the police officers' association and on Monday evening, they surprised Duncan with a new bicycle, purchased by the association.

"You never know someone’s story until you talk to them. A young man’s work ethic and determination moved our officers to help him with his future," the Benicia Police Department said in a Facebook post.

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ABC News(BALTIMORE) --  The 15-year-old girl who was pepper-sprayed by Maryland police has spoken out, sharing her account of what happened Sunday afternoon at a press conference with her mother and attorney Thursday night. Although the teen appeared at the evening press conference, her name has not been released and Ficker has asked that the media refrain from trying to identify her.

The teen said she "stood her ground" when the officers told her she was being detained and that she was "a little dizzy" and everything was "blurry" after she says she was knocked out from colliding with a car.

According to the teen’s attorney, Robin Ficker, she was riding her bike in the street when a car hit her, causing her to "flip over." She was knocked unconscious from the fall and regained consciousness about two minutes later, Ficker said.

However, on police bodycam video released by Hagerstown police yesterday, a motorist is heard telling police that the teen hit the side of his vehicle with her bicycle.

 At another press conference earlier on Thursday, Hagerstown Police Chief Victor Brito told reporters that when his officers arrived, "the juvenile had to be detained" because she began to be "assaultive" while officers attempted to question her about the traffic accident, but that his officers used the "appropriate amount of force."

According to Ficker, the teen got back on her bike and an officer grabbed her and held her tightly as another officer put her in handcuffs. Another cop pulled out a Taser when a bystander approached but the Taser was not deployed, he claims.

In the video released by police, officers can be heard telling the bystander to "get back" multiple times. An officer can then be seen telling the girl to get her hands behind her back as he tries to handcuff her, reminding her that she's "being detained right now."

Ficker also claims that police then "flung her" into the cement, and the girl hit a window sill that was protruding from a wall. He also says she was dragged and put into the back of the police car. Police never informed the teen about what was happening, Ficker said, refuting police claims that the teen was asked if she was "OK."

The teen was "never" slammed, Brito said, but was "placed" against the wall. The video shows her being carried horizontally by two police officers, prior to being put in the patrol car. Brito said the officers asked the girl repeatedly to "calm down." On the tape, while asking for the name of the mother, one officer tells her, "You help me, I'll help you." Brito says that police recognized that the girl was a minor and tried to use their "best adult tone" with her.

 Once she was placed into the police car, Ficker claims she was then pepper-sprayed four times, one time right in her mouth, and not given water. The teen said the spraying had caused her to start choking. Brito said the teen was only sprayed once and that she was able to wash her face with water when she arrived at the station, which he said is protocol.

Police slammed the car door and never put her seat belt on, Ficker said. The video shows police closing the car door after the teen was sprayed.

 She was later taken to the hospital by her father, where she was diagnosed with a possible concussion and other injuries, Ficker said.

"What happened Sunday should never happen to anyone's daughter," Ficker said, adding that the girl is an honor student and soccer player.

The teen's mother also spoke to reporters, condemning police for their treatment of a "disoriented teen" and calling the officers' actions "excessive."

She said her daughter acted the way she did because she was "confused and scared." She said her daughter could have handled the situation better, but wasn't in the right state of mind.

 The teen was charged with disorderly conduct, two counts of second-degree assault, possession of marijuana, and failure to obey a traffic device, police said. The matter was referred to the Department of Juvenile Services. She will not enter a plea, Ficker said, adding that he hopes the Department of Juvenile Services will drop the charges.

The Hagerstown Police Department said it released the videos because it "wanted to share" the perspective from the bodycam footage "to provide a better understanding of that full incident."

"Officers in this country are placed in difficult situations," Brito said Thursday. "It's their job to act in the interest of the community. The last thing we wanted to do is use any force to bring situation under control."

Brito said the officers acknowledged that the teen was a juvenile and did not use excessive force against her. According to Brito, the teen was warned "multiple times" to stop kicking officers before they pepper-sprayed her.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  Two deadly police-involved shootings in one week left two black, middle-aged men dead in two cities 1,000 miles apart.

While there may be similarities in these cases, the aftermaths of these shootings played out very differently. Here's a look how videos of the incidents have been handled, and how the communities reacted in Charlotte, North Carolina, and Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Charlotte

Police say 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott, a black man, was fatally shot by Brentley Vinson, a black officer with the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police, on Tuesday afternoon. Police said Scott "posed an imminent deadly threat to the officers, who subsequently fired their weapon, striking the subject."

Scott's family has said he wasn't armed but police told ABC News there is video, yet to be made public, that shows Scott had a gun in his hand. Police said a gun was recovered from the scene.

However, Police Chief Putney admitted that the videos he reviewed do not provide "definitive visual evidence that would confirm that a person is pointing a gun."

"I did not see that in the videos that I reviewed," he told reporters Thursday. "So what I can tell you, though, is when taken in the totality of all the other evidence, it supports what we've heard and the version of the truth that we gave about the circumstances that happened that led to the death of Mr. Scott."

Police showed dashboard and body camera footage to Scott’s family per their request, attorneys for the family told ABC News on Thursday. But officials have not released any footage to the public. As protesters demand the release of the video, Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts said this morning, “I do believe the video should be released. ... The question is on the timing."

"We want those eyewitnesses to tell us without being led or have their memories changed by what they heard or saw," Roberts told reporters.

Meanwhile, attorneys for Scott’s family provided cell phone video to ABC News today showing the moments leading up to and after the shooting.

Scott's death prompted violent protests in the city this week that left one protester dead and numerous law enforcement officers injured, authorities said. A suspect was arrested in the protester's death, police said.

 John Barnett, who leads a community task force in Charlotte called THUG (True Healing Under God), told ABC News he thinks the Charlotte protests became so violent because the youth who are participating were impatient.

"Young people ... don't have patience for justice or waiting for a video," he said. "I can wait, I can endure two or three weeks, I understand the investigation process. Young people they want the video. Then when they get the video ... what is the response they're gonna have? It's not gonna be a positive one. They can't wait. They're tired."

Barnett said he believes the actions of protesters stem from years of shootings of unarmed black teens and men. "We didn't get any justice for Trayvon Martin. ... We didn't get any justice for Michael Brown," Barnett said, referring to the 17-year-old who was shot and killed by George Zimmerman, and the 18-year-old who was shot and killed by Police Officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri. A grand jury decided not to indict Wilson.

"We were totally upset when ... Zimmerman went free. When O.J. Simpson was set free from all murder charges, white America was angry, mad and wanted to retaliate. They just didn't act on it," Barnett said. "When it happened to Trayvon Martin, when it happened to Walter Scott in South Carolina ... we've had multiple O.J. experiences. And now the young people are doing something about it. They're acting on it."

 During this week's violent protests, Barnett said he took to the streets of Charlotte and tried to defuse the situation.

"The last three nights I've been going up to the youth whispering in their ear," he said. "I grab them real softly ... target them one by one -- you can't get them as [a] group -- [and say] 'The way you're screaming and acting right now, that's not what you call a peaceful protest. If you throw this water bottle at this officer you can get [charged with] assault on an officer.'"

"When you're mad, you don't think. Definitely don't think about repercussions," he said.

He said he whispers quickly, and one by one. "And it works," he said. "Some [of them] want somebody whispering in their ear. But you can't scream at them -- that's what the police are doing."

Going forward, Barnett said, "we need to have a strong dialogue, and physical action, on race relations. ... Race relations is still something we don't want to talk about."

He also suggests dialogue with police. "Get police to create a board -- when something happens [like an officer-involved shooting] the board comes to us and tells us a timeframe [for the investigation]. With Scott, they haven't told us a timeframe."

Tulsa

Days before the deadly Charlotte shooting, a police officer in Tulsa was involved in a deadly shooting.

Betty Shelby, a white Tulsa police officer, is accused of fatally shooting an unarmed black man, 40-year-old Terence Crutcher, last Friday night. Police released video on Monday from a police dashboard camera and from a police helicopter circling overhead. Shelby was charged early this morning with first-degree manslaughter. And in the community, protests was peaceful.

The Tulsa County District Attorney's Office said, "Despite the heightened tensions felt by all -- which seemingly beg for an emotional reaction -- our community has consistently demonstrated a willingness to respect the judicial process. It is the shared responsibility of all who have the ability to control their reactions to do just that."

Marq Lewis of the community activist group We The People Oklahoma told ABC News today that he believes the authorities' willingness to release video, and the community's experience with organizing rallies, contributed to the peaceful demonstration in the city.

"We had immediate transparency with the video," being released by police, he said. "That's a huge thing." In Charlotte, where police have yet to release video, "that creates a sense of untrust," he said.

 Also, "we organize our rallies," Lewis said. He said they make sure there are undercover cops there. "We tell the police department we're having a rally and they have a police presence. We welcome the police. They understand our agenda but we work with them."

"We have a great community of leaders here," Lewis said, adding that they "focus our energy on our specific groups, making sure the message is the same -- arrest Shelby. But we also want peace."

"That's why it's important for us to talk directly to the police chief, the mayor, let them understand -- we are not here to cause problems, we all love our city," he said. "None of us want to tear up our city, we just want justice to be done."

 "I believe in Charlotte, 99 percent of protesters are doing the right thing ... 1 percent are not," Lewis said of the violence there.

In Tulsa, if unplanned "pop-up protests" begin, Lewis said community organizers try to diffuse them. "We want to make sure you are safe," he said. "We're doing a lot of our own community policing, making sure we're accountable."

Lewis, who said he met with the Tulsa chief of police this week, said he aims to hold elected officials accountable for officer-involved shootings in addition to initiating policy changes.

"What I would like to have happen now is justice to be served. But also, we can go back and talk about policy changes," he said. Lewis said the changes he is working for include: mandatory psychological testing for Tulsa officers after shootings and before returning to work, blood tests for cops involved in shootings, and a requirement for medically trained officers to render care.

As for the future of Officer Shelby, Lewis said, "I would like to see her actually go through the process -- a jury of her peers ... and to see her being convicted of manslaughter 1. But we understand that is a long process."

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ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) --  The Federal government invited tribal leaders today to government-to-government consultations, as the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe continues its fight to block construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

The Department of the Interior, Department of Justice, Department of the Army and other federal agencies extended an invitation for consultations on "how the Federal Government can better account for, and integrate tribal views, on future infrastructure decisions throughout the country," as a direct response to what has become one of the biggest Native American demonstrations in decades over a 1,172-mile-long crude oil pipeline.

The movement to block the four-state Dakota Access Pipeline, being built by Texas-based Energy Transfer, has united tribal groups and environmental activists from across the nation, with hundreds still camped out near the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's reservation in North Dakota.

 The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe sued to block construction of pipeline earlier this summer, citing concerns over potential water contamination and destruction to what they deemed to be culturally sacred sites. While a judge in Washington denied the tribe's request for a temporary injunction, the Department of Justice, the Department of the Army and the Department of the Interior intervened with an unprecedented joint statement requesting "that the pipeline company voluntarily pause all construction activity within 20 miles east or west of Lake Oahe."

Dave Archambault II, chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe responded to today's invitation, calling it a "historic moment."

"The Obama Administration’s call for national reform on this issue is a historic moment. We welcome the Administration’s invitation to all tribes to consult on the process for decision-making on infrastructure projects," Archambault said in a statement.

"We have already seen the damage caused by a lack of consultation. The ancient burial sites where our Lakota and Dakota ancestors were laid to rest have been destroyed. The desecration of family graves is something that most people could never imagine," Archambault added.

The chairman said this invitation is "a good start," but a lot more has to be done to protect those who rely on the Missouri River for water.

Kelcy Warren, chairman and CEO of Energy Transfer, denied the tribe's claims, writing in an internal memo, "concerns about the pipeline’s impact on the local water supply are unfounded," and "multiple archaeological studies conducted with state historic preservation offices found no sacred items along the route."

President Obama is set to meet on Monday with Native American leaders in Washington, D.C., when he hosts his final Tribal Nations Conference as president.

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iStock/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) -- A video capturing the moments leading up to and following the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott, which has sparked days of protests across the city of Charlotte, was released by the man’s family Friday.

A woman identified as Scott's wife, Rakeyia Scott, recorded the incident with her cellphone. In the video obtained by The New York Times, an SUV is seen parked in the street as police repeatedly yell at Scott to "drop the gun." Scott's wife, who is standing several feet away from the scene, pleads with the officers not to harm her husband.

"Don't shoot him. Don't shoot him," she says. "He has no weapon. He has no weapon."

Police continue to scream at Keith Lamont Scott: "Drop the gun! Drop the f---ing gun!"

Rakeyia Scott yells back at police, insisting her husband is harmless and doesn't have a gun.

"He doesn't have a gun," she says. "He has a T.B.I. [traumatic brain injury]. He's not going to do anything to you guys. He just took his medicine."

One officer can be heard saying, "Let me get a f---ing baton over here."

Rakeyia Scott then yells to her husband anxiously, "Keith, don't let them break the windows. Come out the car!"

Police order Keith Lamont Scott to "drop the gun" several more times as his wife screams, "Keith! Keith! Don't you do it!"

That's when multiple gunshots ring out. The actual shooting is not shown on the video as Rakeyia Scott points her cellphone at the ground and screams, "Did you shoot him?"

She then runs closer to the scene, angling the cellphone camera again at the spot where her husband was shot.

“He better not be f---ing dead. He better not be f---ing dead,” she yells at police. “He better live. I swear, he better live.”

Scott's body is seen lying in the street surrounded by several officers.

"Did you all call an ambulance?" Scott's wife asks, before the video cuts out.

According to the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department, Scott was treated immediately and later pronounced dead.

The video is the first footage of Scott's encounter with police to be publicly released. Investigators have not released the dashboard and body camera videos.

Police say Scott was holding a handgun, which investigators recovered from an apartment complex in Charlotte, and posed a threat because he was not obeying police orders to remain in his vehicle and drop the weapon. An officer subsequently fired his gun, hitting Scott, who was later pronounced dead.

Scott’s family, however, said he was not armed and was holding a book while waiting for his son to be dropped off from school.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief Kerr Putney said the video evidence alone does not establish probable cause. But the "intent" is to publicly release the video along with other supporting evidence once it's been fully gathered. Still, the timing has to be right, he said.

The probe into Scott's death has now been officially handed over to North Carolina's State Bureau of Investigation, which will be in charge of providing updates and releasing further information on the status of the investigation, according to Putney.

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Obtained by ABC News(ORLANDO, Fla.) -- After opening fire on a group of innocent people in a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, eventually killing dozens, gunman Omar Mateen called police to tell them who he was and what he'd done.

"This is Mateen. I want to let you know I'm in Orlando and I did the shooting," Mateen says in one of three calls to 911 in the early morning hours of June 12, transcripts of which were released Friday by the city of Orlando.

In the calls Mateen pledges allegiance to the Syria-based terror group ISIS and says he "feel[s] the pain of the people getting killed in Syria and Iraq and all over the Muslim..." but doesn't finish the sentence. When the police officer on the other end of the line asks if he's done something about it, Mateen replies, "Yes I have... You already know what I did."

Later in the call Mateen refers to his "homeboy" Tamerlan Tsarnaev, one of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombers, and calls him a "soldier of God."

The three calls between Mateen and the police negotiator unfold over a period of 50 minutes, beginning with the first call at 2:35 a.m. In their last conversation at 3:25 a.m., the negotiator tells Mateen to come outside without any weapons, but Mateen doesn't reply.

Mateen, a New York native of Afghan descent, killed 49 people in his rampage before being gunned down by police. Mateen had been investigated previously by the FBI after he made "inflammatory" comments to co-workers in 2013, but he was determined not to be a threat.

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iStock/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) - -As protesters in Charlotte, North Carolina, continue to demand for the release of video showing the moment when police fatally shot Keith Lamont Scott, the city's mayor and police chief agreed the footage should be made public -- but said it's a matter of when.

"I do believe the video should be released," Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts said at a press conference Friday morning. "The question is on the timing."

Roberts said that at first she wanted the footage to be released immediately to maintain transparency. But officials convinced her that releasing it too soon could jeopardize the integrity of the investigation, she said.

"We want to have integrity in this investigation. We want those eyewitnesses to tell us without being led or have their memories changed by what they heard or saw," she told reporters. "I had to get to this point as well. It was not easy wanting that transparency but also wanting the integrity of the information as it continues to be gathered."

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief Kerr Putney said the video evidence alone does not establish probable cause. But the "intent" is to publicly release the video along with other supporting evidence once it's been fully gathered. Still, the timing has to be right, he said.

The probe into Scott's death has now been officially handed over to North Carolina's State Bureau of Investigation, which will be in charge of providing updates and releasing further information on the status of the investigation, according to Putney.

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iStock/Thinkstock(MADISON, Wis.) -- Heavy rainfall across the Midwest has caused flash flooding around the region, closing some schools and major roadways Friday morning.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker declared a state of emergency in 13 counties as a result of the flooding.

In neighboring Minnesota, up to 14 inches of rain fell overnight on the town of Waseca in the southern part of the state. The Waseca County Sheriff's Office advised in a Facebook post against any unnecessary travel Friday morning until flooding subsides on the roadways.

Waseca County's public schools will remain closed Friday for the second day in a row, school officials announced.

In Steele County, Minnesota, a temporary state of emergency was declared as many major roadways were closed. The county's emergency management officials also reminded the public that it is illegal to move or drive around barricades on closed roads.

In parts of Minnesota, snow plows were called in to clear water off roadways, including Interstate 94.

So far this year, more than 30 inches of rain has fallen on Minneapolis, making it the wettest year since modern recordkeeping began.

Ames, Iowa, also received heavy rainfall overnight, resulting in some flash flooding around the city.

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Tulsa County Jail(TULSA, Okla.) — Tulsa Police Officer Betty Shelby turned herself in early Friday after being charged with first-degree manslaughter in the shooting death of Terence Crutcher.

Shelby was booked Friday morning at the Tulsa County Jail at around 1 a.m. local time and was released on a $50,000.00 bond about 20 minutes later.

Shelby reacted "unreasonably by escalating the situation from a confrontation" with Crutcher, according to an affidavit by an investigator with the Tulsa County District Attorney's Office. Shelby became "emotionally involved" to the point that she overreacted, the affidavit states, adding that she was "not able to see any weapons or bulges indicating a weapon was present."

The Tulsa Police Department said it would make a determination on her employment status after an internal affairs review.

Tulsa Police DepartmentCrutcher, 40, was killed Friday night after Shelby came across his SUV in the middle of a two-lane roadway while it was still running. Crutcher ignored dozens of commands Shelby gave him, according to Wood, and she shot him as he allegedly tried to reached his arm into the open driver's side window.

Another officer who perceived the same threat deployed his Taser at the same time Shelby fired her weapon, Wood said.

Crutcher's family attorneys maintain that the window was up, pointing to the blood spattered on it when he was shot.

Tulsa Police DepartmentDamario Solomon-Simmons, the attorney for Crutcher family, said it was "apparent" that Shelby had to be charged because "a crime had been committed."

"We are happy that charges were brought," Solomon-Simmons said in a press conference. "But, let me be clear. The family wants and deserves full justice, and full justice requires not just charges but a vigorous prosecution and a conviction to those who shot and killed Terence for no reason."

Solomon-Simmons said it would be a "long journey to justice," noting that neither charges nor a conviction would "bring Terence back." He added that Crutcher's family was at the funeral home preparing to bury him.

Crutcher's twin sister, Tiffany Crutcher, said she was "grateful" that "the officer who senselessly killed" her brother "will face charges for her criminal act."

"Our goal as a family is to ensure that this never happens to an innocent citizen," she said, adding that she's "humble" and "grateful" to the community for their support.

"We're going to break the chain of police brutality," she said, calling the charges against Shelby a "small victory."


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Jeff Siner/Charlotte Observer/TNS via Getty Images(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) -- Charlotte police have arrested a suspect in the murder of a protester at a demonstration this week.

The victim, Justin Carr, 26, was fatally shot by another civilian during Wednesday night's demonstrations over the police shooting on Tuesday of Keith Lamont Scott.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief Kerr Putney said at a press conference Friday that video evidence led to the arrest that morning of a suspect in Carr's murder. The investigation is still ongoing.

"Just a tremendous amount of good detective work there," Putney said. "We already have established probable cause and have made that arrest."

Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts said at the press conference that she believes police videos of the shooting "should be released," but it's a question of timing.

Chief Putney said he agreed that the police footage should be made public eventually, but releasing it too soon could undermine the investigation. He also said the probe into Scott's death has been officially handed over to North Carolina's State Bureau of Investigation, which will be in charge of providing updates and releasing further information.

The press conference followed a third night of protests over the police shooting of Scott, but Thursday night's protests were mostly peaceful.

The mayor of North Carolina's most populous city had signed an order for a curfew slated to go into effect at midnight.

But police later said the curfew would not be enforced as long as protests are peaceful -- and that was evident, as demonstrators remained in the streets well past midnight without any police intervention. Before 1 a.m., protesters were laying down in some streets, and marching in others.

The curfew was lifted at 6 a.m., per Mayor Roberts' order. The curfew is part of a proclamation of a state of emergency, that explains such a measure is necessary "in order to more effectively protect the lives and property of the people within the City of Charlotte."

Chanting "No Justice, No Peace" and "Don't Shoot, Hands Up," protesters began peacefully marching down streets around 7:30 p.m. Thursday -- surrounded by rifle-carrying National Guard officers -- carrying signs that read "End Police Terror," "Black Lives Matter," "I Hope I Don't Killed For Being Black" and "Black Power."

At 11:31 p.m., police tweeted that there were "no reports of officer or civilian injuries during tonight's demonstration," but half an hour later, police tweeted that two officers were being treated by EMS workers after they were sprayed with a chemical agent by demonstrators.

At a news conference the following morning, police said a National Guard officer was also treated for an injury suffered during the demonstrations.

Police said a total of three arrests during Thursday night's protests, with charges of failure to disperse, carrying concealed weapon and curfew violation.

The protest began around the same time that attorneys for Scott's family said they had watched police video of Scott's shooting, but were unable to ascertain if Scott indeed had a gun in his hands.

"After watching the videos, the family again has more questions than answers," a statement from the family's attorney's read. "When told by police to exit his vehicle, Mr. Scott did so in a very calm, non-aggressive manner. While police did give him several commands, he did not aggressively approach them or raise his hands at members of law enforcement at any time. It is impossible to discern from the videos what, if anything, Mr. Scott is holding in his hands."

At one point during the evening, protesters stopped to block an intersection near Bank of America's headquarters and chanted "release the tape," but when police and the National Guard moved in, protesters moved on.

Bank of America -- along with Wells Fargo and Duke Energy -- told its employees to stay out of Charlotte.

Protesters also descended upon I-277, as they did the previous two nights. Riot gear-wearing police managed to move protesters off I-277 after dispersing tear gas, according to WSOC. Pepper spray was also used.

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Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture finally opens its doors Friday on the National Mall. It includes 12 inaugural exhibitions and close to 37,000 artifacts, but only 3,000 will be on display.

Here are 10 must-see artifacts featured in the inaugural exhibit.

Rosa Parks’ Dress


Civil Rights activist Rosa Parks was also seamstress. This is the dress Parks was sewing before she was arrested for not giving up her seat on a segregated bus on Dec. 1, 1955.

Parks’ dress is part of the Black Fashion Museum Collection that was donated to NMAAHC.

Michael Jackson’s Fedora


This black fur felt fedora with a gold metal buckle was worn by Jackson during his Victory Tour. The fedora is featured in the Musical Crossroads exhibition on the fourth floor.

Musical Crossroads organizes the intersection of history and culture, grouping stories of musical genres and themes.

Segregation-era Southern Railway Car


A Southern Railway No. 1200 heavyweight passenger coach with segregated compartments.

The entire building is built around two signature items, one of which being a 77-ton, 44-seat segregation-era railway car which serviced Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia and Florida between 1940 and 1960.

This artifact is part of the Segregation Gallery, that focuses on the years 1876 to 1968. The rail car was lifted off semi-trailers and lowered 60 feet into the bottom level of the museum during early stages of construction.

Angola Prison Guard Tower


The Angola Prison guard tower, one of two items the museum is built around, rests on the bottom level of the museum. Used by prison guards to watch prisoners at the Louisiana State Penitentiary in Angola, the prison tower stands nearly 21-feet-tall and 14-feet-wide.

Angola Prison, one of the largest maximum-security prisons in the nation, opened in 1901 and was built on former slave land.

The museum also has a 6-by-9-foot cell from another section of the prison that will be soon be installed in the museum.

Muhammad Ali Headgear


The Muhammad Ali headgear worn by the boxing legend at the 5th Street Gym in Miami is located in the ports exhibition as part of the Communities Gallery. During his time in Miami in the 1960s, Ali converted to Islam and changed his name.

The sports gallery looks at the contributions of African-American athletes.

Hope School Desk


School desks from the Hope School, a Rosenwald school in South Carolina, can be found on the third floor in the Community Gallery "Making a Way Out of No Way." According to the museum, the Hope School was one of more than 5,000 rural schools supported by the Julius Rosenwald Fund. Artifacts donated from the Hope School include its original sign, 10 desks and a wood-burning stove.

The “Making A Way Out Of No Way” exhibition reflects stories of blacks' perseverance, resourcefulness and resilience.

Nat Turner’s Bible


Nat Turner’s bible can be seen in the History Gallery "Slavery and Freedom." Turner was a slave and minister who led a slave rebellion in Virginia in 1831. Descendants of Lavinia Francis, a slaveholder who survived the rebellion, donated the bible to the museum.

According to the museum, it is thought that Turner was holding this bible when he was captured two months after the rebellion.

President Obama Hand-painted Banner for Obama Presidential Campaign 2008


The museum brings visitors to the present day with a banner for Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign. Hand-painted in New Haven, Connecticut, this banner is one of the artifacts honoring our nation’s first black president and his legacy.

President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama attended the museum's groundbreaking ceremony in Washington, D.C., in February 2012. The president will deliver remarks during the museum's opening ceremony where he will be joined by other distinguished guests.

1968 Olympic Warm-up Suit Worn by Tommie Smith


Upon entering the Sports Gallery, visitors are greeted by a statue from the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City where African-American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their fists during the American National Anthem, making a political statement during the medal ceremony to bring attention to the inequality in the U.S.

The 1968 Olympic warm-up suit worn by Smith is here on display to honor the contributions of African-American athletes in sports.

Chuck Berry’s Cadillac


Chuck Berry's Cadillac.

Chuck Berry’s red convertible Cadillac is part of his personal fleet and was driven during the filming of "Hail! Hail! Rock ’n’ Roll," a 1987 documentary that chronicles two 1986 concerts celebrating his 60th birthday.

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